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Phone  850.599.3611
Fax  850.561.2080

Human Resources
1700 S. Adams St.
211 Foote-Hilyer Administration Center (FHAC)
Tallahassee, FL 32307
 
 

Office of Human Resources

About Human Resources

A Message From the Chief HR and Diversity Officer

Welcome to the Office of Human Resources at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University!

Human Resources serves as a "strategic" partner and collaborator with the University’s varied stakeholders, ensuring alignment of the function to the business of university administration. These partnerships afford the Office of Human Resources the flexibility to not only anticipate and proactively manage change and HR matters, but also to take proactive leadership in many other areas as appropriate. It is with this view of performance that the entire HR team strives to deliver HR systems, tools and services to Florida A&M University in a manner exemplifying professionalism, service excellence, respect, teamwork and with the utmost regard for diversity and inclusion.

Joyce A. Ingram, J.D.
Associate Vice President
Chief HR and Diversity Officer
 

About Human Resources

HR is a full-service department that is responsible for providing and addressing a wide range of human resources and personnel related services to the University.  Among the responsibilities of HR are benefits and retirement; classification, recruitment and employment; diversity and inclusion; employee relations and record management; organizational development and training; payroll; time and labor; and workforce administration.

Strategic Imperatives

Diversity and Inclusion
Operational Effectiveness and Efficiency
Talent Management


HR Mission Statement

To continually improve and sustain the University’s ability to attract, develop and retain excellent and diverse talent in a compliant and inclusive environment.

HR Vision Statement

To become the undisputed high performing center of excellence for talent management, diversity, and stakeholder engagement.

Core Values

Diversity and Inclusion - Understanding, respecting and leveraging the differences of individuals and their respective cultures through active participation and stakeholder engagement.

Performance – Achieving the best results through ownership and successful completion of our work, on time and within budget, for the greater good of the team and the University.

Respect – Showing kindness and regard for the dignity and contributions of others in a diplomatic, tempered and compassionate manner.

Service Excellence – Delivering services, systems and tools to all stakeholders with the highest level of professionalism, integrity, competency and honesty.

Teamwork – Working together toward a common purpose and goal through collaboration and partnering with all stakeholders for the greater good of the team and the University.

Guiding Principles

As HR Practitioners, we will hold ourselves accountable for our actions, words and deeds by embracing and adopting the following guiding principles for optimal individual and team performance.

Communications

Ethical Behavior

Give and Receive Feedback

Manage Conflict

Understand our Roles and Responsibilities as Team Members

Make Decisions

Problem Solve and Process Improvement

Offices and Sections

Every day we are presented with countless choices that involve doing the right thing; however, the right thing to do isn't always the easiest thing to do. A moral dilemma is a struggle in which one must choose between two or more actions, neither of which has a universal, definitive consensus on whether it is 'right' or 'wrong', and there are likely valid arguments for either side. An issue that can be considered a moral dilemma is that of euthanasia. In contemporary society, a frequent topic for moral discussion is euthanasia, which is the act of painlessly ending the life of a person for reasons of mercy. Typically for the terminally ill or those in a position of long-term suffering, it is legal in some countries for medical doctors to perform euthanasia at the request of the patient. On the one hand, there is virtue in granting someone the mercy of a life ended with dignity, and on the other, many persons argue that good intentions aside, euthanasia is still fundamentally the act of ending a life, and is therefore murder, which is generally agreed to be both a crime and morally wrong- thus, the moral dilemma. .

Florida A&M University
Office of Human Resources
211 Foote-Hilyer Admin Center
Tallahassee, Florida 32307-3200