About

Potentially Invasive Weevil Species from the Caribbean Countries to the United States is a multi commodity based resource initiative to provide accurate identification of 25 genera and 40 weevil species. The tool includes dorsal & lateral habitus and diagnostic character images of adult weevil species, no immature stages of these species are included in this identification tool at this time. In addition, related information available in literature on each species distribuiton, hosts, damage, biology, ecology, etc. are also provided. A number of species provided in this tool are not native to the Caribbean Countries. However, these species were first reported in these countries and either already reached the United States via agricultural trade or remained serious threat from the Caribbean Countries to the United States. These weevils cause damage to numerous commodities of economical importance including citrus, sugarcane, banana, palms, sweet potato, rice, coffee, beans, cassava, pineapple, mango, storegrains, pine, mahogany, tamarind, Dahlbergia, etc., etc.

Potentially Invasive Weevil Species from the Caribbean Countries to the United States is being developed and published by the Center for Biological Control (CBC), College of Engineering Sciences, Technology and Agricuture (CESTA), Florida A&M University (FAMU) in cooperation with the USDA/APHIS/PPQ Center for Plant Health Science and Technology (CPHST) as a part of its cooperative agreement with the CBC, FAMU.

CPHST is the scientific support organization for the Plant Protection and Quarantine division of the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). CPHST National Science Program Leader Daniel Fieselmann and CPHST Lucid Coordinator oversaw tool development.

Most of the images and drawings in this resource were produced by Dr. Muhammad Haseeb. All other images in this tool are credited as well.

For information concerning Potentially Invasive Weevil Species from the Caribbean Countries to the United States and to offer any feedback of comments, please contact Dr. Muhammad Haseeb at Muhammad.Haseeb@famu.edu. or Dr. Moses Kairo at Moses.Kairo@famu.edu.