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Chemical and Biomedical Engineering

Faculty
Department Overview
Research Facilities
Graduate Program in Chemical Engineering
Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering
Qualifying Examination Requirements
Academic Regulations and Procedures

Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering Faculty

Rufina Alamo, Professor; Ph.D. Madrid, 1981. Polymer crystallization and characterization; structure - property relations; morphology of semi-crystalline polymers.
Ravindran Chella, Associate Professor; Ph.D. U. Massachusetts, 1984. Biomolecular transport in microchannels and nano-channels; morphogen transport in tissue constructs.
John R. Collier, Professor; Ph.D. Case Institute, 1966. Rheology; processing of polymers; biomass conversion ; whiskey processing.
Wright C. Finney, Research Associate; M.S. Florida State, 1978. Environmental science and engineering; aerosol dynamics and characterization.
Samuel C. Grant, Assistant Professor; Ph.D. U. Illinois-Chicago, 2001. Magnetic resonance microscopy; neurodegenerative diseases; bioengineered constructs & materials; high field MRI contrast; single cell diffusion analysis; spectroscopy and osmoregulation.
Jingjiao Guan, Assistant Professor; Ph.D. Ohio State, 2005. Micro and nano-devices for drug delivery.
Egwu E. Kalu, Associate Professor; Ph.D. Texas A&M, 1991. Electrochemical engineering; electrophysiological processes.
Milen K. Kostov, Assistant Professor; Ph.D. Penn State, 2003. Nanoscience for clean energy technologies; chemical reactions in nano-porous media; multi-scale modeling; simulation and theory of nanoscale materials; physical adsorption of gases in nanomaterials and applications.
Bruce R. Locke, Professor and Chair; Ph.D. North Carolina State, 1989, P.E. Transport/reaction in tissues and complex media; transport process using NMR/MRI; reaction kinetics in non-thermal plasmas.
Teng Ma, Associate Professor; Ph.D. Ohio State, 1999. Cell and tissue engineering; biomaterials.
Anant K. Paravastu, Assistant Professor; PhD. U. California – Berkeley, 2004. Protein self-assembly, amyloid diseases; regenerative medicine; solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.
Subramanian Ramakrishnan, Assistant Professor; Ph.D. U. Illinois Champaign-Urbana, 2001. Colloidal and interfacial science; nanoparticle self assembly; structure-property relationships in soft condensed matter.
Loren B. Schreiber, Professor; Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, 1975. Engineering education; batch reaction and batch distillation; physical properties of fine organic chemicals.
Theo Siegrist, Professor; Ph.D. ETH Switzerland, 1982. Organic semiconductors; structural analysis of organic nanoscale materials.
John C. Telotte, Associate Professor; Ph.D. U. Florida, 1985. Chemical thermodynamics; radon transport; semiconductor processing, fuel cell development.

Affiliate Faculty

Ching-Jen Chen, Affiliate Professor and Dean of the College of Engineering; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve, 1967. Heat transfer, fluid mechanics, numerical simulation, biomagnetics.
Mandip Sachdeva, Professor of Pharmacy (FAMU); Ph.D., Dalhouise University, 1994. Drug delivery systems, pharmaceutics.
Sachin Shanbhag, Assistant Professor, Department of Scientific Computing (FSU); Ph.D., Michigan, 2004. Computer modeling of polymer rheology; modeling of biological cell morphology and interactions.

Department Overview


The Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering offers the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy Ph.D.) and Master of Science (M.S.) in both Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, and the Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Chemical Engineering. The bachelor’s degree is accredited by ABET. The Department is strongly committed to continue building a graduate research program of national reputation in both applied and fundamental areas. The faculty believes that graduate programs must be diverse, interdisciplinary, and flexible in order to prepare chemical engineers that can handle challenging applications of the modern chemical industry. Fifteen full-time teaching faculty members, one adjunct teaching professor, and one research associate currently comprise the faculty.

Major research areas include:
• Tissue Engineering for Bone and Cartilage Replacement
• Advanced Polymeric Materials Characterization and Rheology
• Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cells, Tissues, and Organisms
• Plasma Reaction Engineering for Pollution Control and Disinfection
• Sustainable Conversion of Energy
• Advanced Computational Methods in Materials, Catalysis, and Transport

Many of these efforts are conducted in close cooperation with the Florida State University Institute of Molecular Biophysics (IMB), Department of Scientific Computing, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), Center for Materials Research and Technology (MARTECH), and the Departments of Physics, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Biological Sciences; the Florida A&M University School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; as well as with the Departments of Mechanical, Industrial, and Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering.

Please contact the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering at: Suite 131, 2525 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, Florida, 32310–6046; phone: (850) 410-6149 or 410-6151; fax: (850) 410-6150; e-mail: cheme@eng.fsu.edu; or Web site: www.eng.fsu.edu/departments/cbe.

Research Facilities

The Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering has extensive research laboratory facilities located in the present College of Engineering building. Three undergraduate teaching laboratories, a design classroom, and twelve graduate research laboratories comprise the current physical resources. All laboratories are well equipped with modern experimental apparatus including numerous workstations and microcomputers for data acquisition and analysis. These facilities include laboratories dedicated to polymer science and engineering, electrochemical engineering, aerosol transport and deposition, batch process optimization and control operations, gas/liquid phase pollution treatment by non-thermal plasma, advanced fluid mechanics, bioengineering, and tissue engineering.

In addition, a large laboratory suite in the Department is dedicated to nuclear magnetic resonance research; this laboratory includes a 500 MHz (11.75 Tesla) wide-bore, microimaging NMR spectrometer, and a larger bore, lower field NMR spectrometer for the study of larger scale biological samples. Faculty are also closely affiliated with the world-class FSU National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (www.magnet.fsu.edu) and make extensive use of NHMFL resources and instrumentation, including very high field NMR instruments.

A wide range of analytical equipment are located in these laboratories, including gas and liquid chromatographs, UV-Vis spectrophotometers, a chemiluminescence gas analyzer, aerosol particle measurement instrumentation, analytical microscopes, an FTIR spectrometer, potentiostats, a rotating disk electrode system, a hydraulic press for electrode fabrication, differential scanning calorimeters, and pH, conductivity, temperature, flow, pressure, mass and other measuring devices. Process equipment including various types of gas and liquid phase chemical reactors, controlled temperature fermentors, and polymer production reactors are also located in these laboratories. Infrastructure includes several autoclaves, controlled environment incubators water polishing systems, refrigerated/heating circulating baths, isotemp ovens, high voltage power supplies, high purity gas production and mixing systems, a refrigerated centrifuge, a glassware cleaning device, and numerous additional support equipment.

In the area of computing capabilities, the Department has numerous personal computers interconnected to the Colleges' computing network. MATLAB, MATHCAD, CHEMCAD, Aspen, and other UNIX and PC-based programs are readily available to graduate students in their computational research. Extensive, high level computing capabilities are available to students and faculty through the Florida State University Academic Computing and Network Service (FSU ACNS) and Department of Scientific Computing network cluster. Capabilities of this facility include: 1) an aggregate of 800 interconnected CPUs, and 2) the HPC system, with 128 computer nodes (512 CPUs) and 4 head nodes (2.5 TFLOPS of throughput). All students are given computer accounts allowing unlimited access to the Internet.


Graduate Program in Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering (ChE) encompasses the development, application, and operation of the processes in which chemical and/or physical changes of material are involved. The work of a chemical engineer is to analyze, develop, design, control, construct, and/or supervise chemical processes in research and development, pilot-scale operations, and industrial production. Emphasis is placed on the application of computer analysis to problems encountered in the above areas. Chemical engineers are employed in the manufacture of inorganic chemicals (i.e., acids, alkalis, pigments, fertilizers), organic chemicals (i.e., petrochemicals, polymers, fuels, propellants, pharmaceuticals, specialty chemicals), biological products (i.e., enzymes, vaccines, biochemicals, biofuels), foods, semiconductors, and paper.

Chemical engineers having graduate degrees work in a wide range of organizations where their technical skills are needed. These may include: local, state, and federal governments; private and public corporations; and education. Chemical engineers are involved in process and plant operation, technical services groups, research and development laboratories, plant design groups, occupational and safety programs, technical sales, technical training, and technical management. Graduate education can lead to careers in the medical sciences, chemical engineering, and other engineering and scientific disciplines as well as business and law.


Master of Science (MS) in Chemical Engineering
Admission Requirements - MS in ChE

  1. A baccalaureate degree in Chemical Engineering or an allied field from an accredited college or university;
  2. Fulfillment of the requirements for the baccalaureate degree or its equivalent, and evidence by ORIGINAL transcript of a satisfactory prior academic record. Students may be required to satisfy deficiencies by taking undergraduate courses if they do not have a degree from an accredited chemical engineering degree program;
  3. U.S. students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher and a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE;
  4. International students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE exam. In addition, students whose native language is not English are required to take the TOEFL exam and receive a score of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based) or 80 (Internet-based); and
  5. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the student's work and background, as well as a statement of professional goals.

Note: all students must present GRE scores prior to being admitted.

Students who do not possess a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering may be required to complete a Department-designated sequence of undergraduate courses with grade of "B" or higher in each course. Up to six (6) semester hours of 4000-level course work approved by the department may be counted as graduate electives. Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours with departmental approval. Typical undergraduate course sequences (in preparation for graduate courses) may include, but are not limited to, the following courses:

ECH 3023 Mass and Energy Balances I (3)
ECH 3024 Mass and Energy Balances (3)
ECH 3101 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
ECH 3266 Introductory Transport Phenomena (3)
ECH 3418 Separations Processes (3)
ECH 3854 Chemical Engineering Computations (4)
ECH 4267 Advanced Transport Phenomena (3)
ECH 4504 Kinetics and Reactor Design (3).

Additional courses in subjects, including mathematics, chemistry, physics, and general engineering, may also be required. Departmental financial support may not be available for graduate students taking undergraduate courses.

Degree Requirements - MS in ChE

The Program in Chemical Engineering offers both thesis-type and course-type (non-thesis) options leading to the Master of Science degree.

Chemical Engineering - Thesis Option (30 semester hours)
The thesis-type master's degree is awarded upon successful completion of the following requirements:
1. Twelve (12) semester hours of chemical engineering graduate core courses.
    • ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3).
                • ECH 5126 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I (3).
                • ECH 5261 - Advanced Transport Phenomena I (3).
                • ECH 5840 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3).
2. Nine (9) semester hours of approved electives.
    • Students should consult their major professor to determine the elective courses offered by the Department. Additional elective courses may be found in the University Graduate Bulletin.
3. Nine (9) semester hours of thesis.
    • ECH 5971r - Thesis (1-9) (S/U grade only).
4. Oral defense of the Master's thesis.
    • ECH 8976 - Thesis Defense (0) (P/F grade only). In addition to the thirty (30) semester hours of coursework and thesis, an oral examination in defense of the thesis is required for the Master of   
      Science in Chemical Engineering thesis option.
5. Registration and attendance at all departmental seminars each term.
    • ECH 5935r, Chemical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only).

No course with a grade below "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. No more than one course with a grade of "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. The candidate also must complete and defend an original thesis (ECH 8976, Thesis Defense).

All ChE graduate students must attend the required training in the Program for Instructional Excellence (PIE) Workshop to prepare for teaching assistant (TA) duties. This requirement is mandatory regardless of the student's classification as a teaching assistant or research assistant. In addition, all students are required to take required safety training courses as necessary.

Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours towards the MS degree and only with departmental approval.

Chemical Engineering - Course (non-thesis) Option, (33 semester hours)


The course-type Master's degree is awarded upon successful completion of the following requirements:
1. Twelve (12) semester hours of chemical engineering graduate core courses.
     • ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3).
                 • ECH 5126 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I (3).
                 • ECH 5261 - Advanced Transport Phenomena I (3).
                 • ECH 5840 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3).
2. Twenty-one (21) semester hours of approved electives.
    • Students should consult their major professor to determine the elective courses offered by the Department. Additional elective courses may be found in the University Graduate Bulletin.
3. Registration and attendance at all departmental seminars each term.
    • ECH 5935r, Chemical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only).

No course with a grade below "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. No more than one course with a grade of "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements.

All ChE graduate students must attend the required training in the Program for Instructional Excellence (PIE) Workshop to prepare for teaching assistant (TA) duties. This requirement is mandatory regardless of the student's classification as a teaching assistant or research assistant. In addition, all students are required to take required safety training courses as necessary.

Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours towards the MS degree and only with departmental approval.

Note: Departmental support generally is not available for students pursuing a non-thesis master's degree.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Chemical Engineering

Admission Requirements - Ph.D. in ChE
  1. Fulfillment of the Department's admission and core course requirements for the ChE master's degree or its substantive equivalent.
1.1. A baccalaureate degree in ChE or an allied field from an accredited college or university.
1.2. Fulfillment of the requirements for the baccalaureate degree or its equivalent, and evidence by ORIGINAL transcript of a satisfactory prior academic record. Students may be required to satisfy 
       deficiencies by taking undergraduate courses if they do not have a degree from an accredited chemical engineering degree program.
1.3. U.S. students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, and a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE.
            1.4. International students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE exam. In addition, students whose native
                   language is not English are required to take the TOEFL exam and receive a score of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based) or 80 (Internet-based).
            1.5. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the student's work and background, as well as a statement of professional goals.

        2. Maintenance of a high scholastic record at the previous college or university attended.

Students who meet the admission requirements are encouraged to apply for the Ph.D. program. Students who maintain a 3.0 graduate GPA and demonstrate proficiency in conducting research in chemical engineering by passing the departmental Ph.D. qualifying examination (see Ph.D. Qualifying Examination Requirements below for more details) are admitted to Ph.D. candidacy. Students who fulfill these requirements may, upon approval of the graduate committee and major supervisor, proceed directly toward the Ph.D. without first obtaining a Master's degree.

Students with a thesis-type Master's degree in Chemical Engineering from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering may, with approval of the graduate committee and major professor, take nine (9) additional approved semester hours beyond the master's requirements to satisfy the 30-hour course requirement for the Ph.D. All other requirements must be fulfilled as stated below. Students with Master's degrees in ChE from other institutions will be given a specific course plan by the departmental Graduate Committee. A maximum of thirty (30) semester hours may be assigned to remedy any deficiencies in the student's background.

Degree Requirements - Ph.D. in ChE

Fifty-four (54) semester hours are required for the Ph.D. degree in ChE as follows:
1. Twelve (12) semester hours of ChE core courses.
    • ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3)
                • ECH 5126 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I (3)
                • ECH 5261 - Advanced Transport Phenomena I (3)
                • ECH 5840 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3)
2. Eighteen (18) semester hours of approved electives.
    • Students should consult their major professor to determine the elective courses offered by the Department. Additional elective courses may be found in the University Graduate Bulletin.
3. Twenty-four (24) semester hours of dissertation.
    • ECH 6980r - Dissertation (1-9) (S/U grade only).
4. Successful completion of the doctoral qualifying exam.
    • ECH 8965r - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (0) (P/F grade only).
5. Successful defense of an oral and written dissertation.
    • ECH 8985 – Dissertation Defense (0) (P/F grade only).
6. Registration and attendance at all departmental seminars each term.
    • ECH 5935r, Chemical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only).

No course with a grade below "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. No more than one course with a grade of "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements.

All ChE graduate students must attend the required training in the Program for Instructional Excellence (PIE) Workshop to prepare for teaching assistant (TA) duties. This requirement is mandatory regardless of the student's classification as a teaching assistant or research assistant. In addition, all students are required to take required safety training courses as necessary.

Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours towards the MS degree and only with departmental approval.

The Ph.D. degree will be awarded to a doctoral candidate upon successful completion of the following requirements:
1. Passage of the ChE Ph.D. Qualifying Examination (ECH 8965r) within two (2) consecutive exam attempts (see Ph.D. Qualifying Examination Requirements below for more details); successful completion will result in formal admission to Ph.D. candidacy.
2. Selection of a research topic and major professor(s).
3. Formation of a supervisory committee in consultation with the major professor(s).
4. Submission and defense of a prospectus on the dissertation topic to the supervisory committee.
5. Completion of thirty (30) semester hours of advanced coursework (including twelve [12] semester hours of core graduate coursework).
6. Completion of at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of dissertation research.
7. One semester teaching assistantship in the undergraduate laboratory.
8. Presentation of a research topic at one local, regional, national or international professional meeting.
9. Submission or publication of scholarly articles based on original dissertation research in peer-reviewed journals.
10. Satisfaction of the University residency requirement.
11. Presentation and defense of an original dissertation (ECH 8985r, Dissertation Defense).

All paperwork associated with the above requirements (see forms) must be submitted in a timely fashion to the departmental office with appropriate signatures for review by the Graduate Committee and its Chair.


Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering

Recent dramatic advances in health care and medical technology made possible by the merger of engineering and medicine have prompted the development of new graduate degree programs in biomedical engineering at many of the top institutions in the U.S. Currently, biomedical engineering is the most rapidly growing graduate engineering discipline in the U.S. The overall goal of this program is to implement education and research in biomedical engineering that will prepare graduates for industrial, governmental, and academic careers in the bioengineering, biotechnology, and related professions.

The graduate program in biomedical engineering (BME) promotes a special emphasis in cellular and tissue engineering. Advanced engineering, medical, chemistry, physics, and biology students will gain the necessary knowledge and skills that will allow them to contribute to improved technology in health and medical care and to solve real-world engineering problems in biology and medicine, both in educational and industrial settings.


Master of Science (M.S.) in Biomedical Engineering  

Admission Requirements - M.S. in BME

  1. A baccalaureate degree in engineering, chemistry, physics, or biological sciences or an allied field from an accredited college or university.
  2. Fulfillment of the requirements for the baccalaureate biomedical engineering degree or its equivalent, and evidence by ORIGINAL transcript of a satisfactory prior academic record. Students may be required to satisfy deficiencies by taking undergraduate courses if they do not have a degree from an accredited biomedical engineering degree program.
  3. U.S. students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, and a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE.
  4. International students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE exam. In addition, students whose native language is not English are required to take the TOEFL exam and receive a score of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based) or 80 (Internet-based).
  5. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the student's work and background, as well as a statement of professional goals.

Note: All students must present GRE scores prior to being admitted.


Students who do not possess a bachelor's degree in chemical or biomedical engineering may be required to complete a Department-designated sequence of undergraduate courses with grade of "B" or higher in each course. Up to six (6) semester hours of 4000-level course work approved by the department may be counted as graduate electives. Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours with departmental approval. Typical undergraduate course sequences (in preparation for graduate courses) may include, but are not limited to, the following courses:

ECH 3023 Mass and Energy Balances I (3)
ECH 3024 Mass and Energy Balances (3)
ECH 3101 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics (3)
ECH 3266 Introductory Transport Phenomena (3)
ECH 3418 Separations Processes (3)
ECH 3854 Chemical Engineering Computations (4)
ECH 4267 Advanced Transport Phenomena (3)
ECH 4504 Kinetics and Reactor Design (3)
BME 4403C Quantitative Anatomy and Systems Physiology I (3)
BME 4404C Quantitative Anatomy and Systems Physiology II (3)

In addition, students also should have taken the following courses (if not included in their previous degree program): Biological Sciences I and II, and Biochemistry I and II. Acceptance of equivalent courses is evaluated on a case-by-case basis following petition to the Graduate Committee. Departmental financial support may not be available for graduate students taking undergraduate courses.

Degree Requirements - M.S. in BME

The Program in Biomedical Engineering offers both thesis-type and course-type (non-thesis) options for the master of science degree.

The thesis-type master’s degree is awarded upon successful completion of the following requirements:
1.    Twelve (12) semester hours of biomedical engineering graduate core courses.
• ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3).
• ECH 5261 - Advanced Transport Phenomena (3).
• ECH 5840 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3).
• XXX XXXX - Approved Course in Physiology or Cell Biology (3).

An approved course in Physiology or Cell Biology is required for completion of the graduate BME degree. Approved courses include: PCB 5746 - Mammalian Physiology I; PCB 5747 - Mammalian Physiology II; PCB 5796 - Sensory Physiology; PCB 5835 - Neurophysiology; PCB 5137 - Advanced Cell Biology; PCB 5525 - Molecular Biology; PCB 5845 - Cell and Molecular Neuroscience; and BCH 5405 - Molecular Biology. Additional courses may satisfy the physiology/biology requirement but require petition to the Graduate Committee for approval as a core substitute.

2.    Nine (9) semester hours of approved electives;
• Students should consult their major professor to determine the elective courses offered by the Department. Additional elective courses may be found in the University Graduate Bulletin.
3.    Nine (9) semester hours of BME 5971 - Thesis;
• BME 5971r - Thesis (1-9) (S/U grade only).
4.    Oral defense of the master’s thesis;
• BME 5971r - Thesis (1-9) (S/U grade only).
5.    Registration and attendance at all departmental seminars.
• BME 5935r, Biomedical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only).

No course with a grade below "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. No more than one course with a grade of "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. The candidate also must complete and defend an original thesis (BME 8976, Thesis Defense).

All ChE graduate students must attend the required training in the Program for Instructional Excellence (PIE) Workshop to prepare for teaching assistant (TA) duties. This requirement is mandatory regardless of the student's classification as a teaching assistant or research assistant. In addition, all students are required to take required safety training courses as necessary.

Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours towards the MS degree and only with departmental approval.

Biomedical Engineering - Course (Non-Thesis) Option (33 semester hours)


The course-type master’s degree is awarded upon successful completion of the following requirements:

1.    Twelve (12) semester hours of biomedical engineering core courses.
• ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3)
• ECH 5261 - Advanced Transport Phenomena (3)
• ECH 5840 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3)
• XXX XXXX - Approved Course in Physiology or Cell Biology (3)
 
An approved course in Physiology or Cell Biology is required for completion of the graduate BME degree. Approved courses include: PCB 5746 - Mammalian Physiology I; PCB 5747 - Mammalian Physiology II; PCB 5796 - Sensory Physiology; PCB 5835 - Neurophysiology; PCB 5137 - Advanced Cell Biology; PCB 5525 - Molecular Biology; PCB 5845 - Cell and Molecular Neuroscience; and BCH 5405 - Molecular Biology. Additional courses may satisfy the physiology/biology requirement but require petition to the Graduate Committee for approval as a core substitute.

2.    Twenty-one (21) semester hours of approved electives.
• Students should consult their major professor to determine the elective courses offered by the Department. Additional elective courses may be found in the University Graduate Bulletin.
 
3.    Registration and attendance at all departmental seminars.
• BME 5935r, Biomedical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only).
 
No courses with a grade below “C” will be counted towards fulfillment of degree requirements.  No more than one course with a grade in the “C”  will be counted towards fulfillment of degree requirements.

All ChE graduate students must attend the required training in the Program for Instructional Excellence (PIE) Workshop to prepare for teaching assistant (TA) duties. This requirement is mandatory regardless of the student's classification as a teaching assistant or research assistant. In addition, all students are required to take required safety training courses as necessary.

Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours towards the MS degree and only with departmental approval.

Note: Departmental support is generally is not available for students pursuing a non-thesis master’s degree.    

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Biomedical Engineering

Admission Requirements

1)     Fulfillment of the Department's admission and core course requirements for the ChE master's degree or its substantive equivalent.
1.1. A baccalaureate degree in engineering, chemistry, physics, or biological sciences or an allied field from an accredited college or university.
1.2. Fulfillment of the requirements for the baccalaureate degree in biomedical engineering or its equivalent, and evidence by ORIGINAL transcript of a satisfactory prior academic record. Students may be required to satisfy deficiencies by taking undergraduate courses if they do not have a degree from an accredited biomedical engineering degree program.
1.3. U.S. students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, and a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE.
1.4. International students: an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher, a minimum combined score of 1200 on the verbal and quantitative portions of the GRE exam. In addition, students whose native language is not English are required to take the TOEFL exam and receive a score of at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based) or 80 (Internet-based).
1.5. Three letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the student's work and background, as well as a statement of professional goals.
2. Maintenance of a high scholastic record at the previous college or university attended.

Students who meet the admission requirements are encouraged to apply for the Ph.D. program. Students who maintain a 3.0 graduate GPA and demonstrate proficiency in conducting research in biomedical engineering by passing the departmental Ph.D. qualifying examination (see Ph.D. Qualifying Examination Requirements below for more details) are admitted to Ph.D. candidacy. Students who fulfill these requirements may, upon approval of the graduate committee and major supervisor, proceed directly toward the Ph.D. without first obtaining a Master's degree.

Students with a thesis-type Master's degree in Chemical or Biomedical Engineering from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering may, with approval of the graduate committee and major professor, take nine (9) additional approved semester hours beyond the master's requirements to satisfy the 30-hour course requirement for the Ph.D. All other requirements must be fulfilled as stated below. Students with Master's degrees in ChE or BME from other institutions will be given a specific course plan by the departmental Graduate Committee. A maximum of thirty (30) semester hours may be assigned to remedy any deficiencies in the student's background.

Degree Requirements - Ph.D. in BME

Fifty-four (54) semester hours are required for the Ph.D. degree in BME as follows:
1. Twelve (12) semester hours of BME core courses.
• ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3).
• ECH 5261 - Advanced Transport Phenomena (3).
• ECH 5840 - Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3).
• XXX XXXX - Approved Course in Physiology or Cell Biology (3).
 
An approved course in Physiology or Cell Biology is required for completion of the graduate BME degree. Approved courses include: PCB 5746 - Mammalian Physiology I; PCB 5747 - Mammalian Physiology II; PCB 5796 - Sensory Physiology; PCB 5835 - Neurophysiology; PCB 5137 - Advanced Cell Biology; PCB 5525 - Molecular Biology; PCB 5845 - Cell and Molecular Neuroscience; and BCH 5405 - Molecular Biology. Additional courses may satisfy the physiology/biology requirement but require petition to the Graduate Committee for approval as a core substitute.

2. Eighteen (18) semester hours of approved electives.
• Students should consult their major professor to determine the elective courses offered by the Department. Additional elective courses may be found in the University Graduate Bulletin.
3. Twenty-four (24) semester hours of dissertation.
• BME 6980r - Dissertation (1-9) (S/U grade only).
4. Successful completion of the doctoral qualifying exam.
• BME 8965r - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (0) (P/F grade only).
5. Successful defense of an oral and written dissertation.
• BME 8985 – Dissertation Defense (0) (P/F grade only).
6. Registration and attendance at all departmental seminars each term.
• BME 5935r, Chemical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only).
 
No course with a grade below "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements. No more than one course with a grade of "C" will be counted toward fulfillment of degree requirements.

All ChE graduate students must attend the required training in the Program for Instructional Excellence (PIE) Workshop to prepare for teaching assistant (TA) duties. This requirement is mandatory regardless of the student's classification as a teaching assistant or research assistant. In addition, all students are required to take required safety training courses as necessary.

Transfer credit from another institution is limited to six (6) semester hours towards the MS degree and only with departmental approval.

The Ph.D. degree will be awarded to a doctoral candidate upon successful completion of the following requirements:
  1. Passage of the BME Ph.D. Qualifying Examination (ECH 8965r) within two (2) consecutive exam attempts (see Ph.D. Qualifying Examination Requirements below for more details); successful completion will result in formal admission to PhD candidacy.
  2. Selection of a research topic and major professor(s).
  3. Formation of a supervisory committee in consultation with the major professor(s).
  4. Submission and defense of a prospectus on the dissertation topic to the supervisory committee.
  5. Completion of thirty (30) semester hours of advanced coursework (including twelve [12] semester hours of core graduate coursework).
  6. Completion of at least twenty-four (24) semester hours of dissertation research.
  7. One semester teaching assistantship in the undergraduate laboratory.
  8. Presentation of a research topic at one local, regional, national or international professional meeting.
  9. Submission or publication of scholarly articles based on original dissertation research in peer-reviewed journals.
  10. Satisfaction of the University residency requirement.
  11. Presentation and defense of an original dissertation (BME 8985r, Dissertation Defense).
All paperwork associated with the above requirements (see forms) must be submitted in a timely fashion to the departmental office with appropriate signatures for review by the Graduate Committee and its Chair.

Qualifying Examination Requirements

Successful Ph.D. candidates will have a sound background in engineering, as well as the creativity and judgment necessary to conduct independent research. The purpose of the qualifying examination is to assess these qualities with an emphasis on evaluating the student's potential to conduct an original course of study and investigation. The qualifying examination tests the student's ability (1) to define, describe and examine critically relevant literature; (2) to think creatively and to apply basic chemical/biomedical engineering concepts; (3) to communicate in a scholarly and rigorous manner the progress and results of research; and (4) to conduct productive, rigorous and creative scientific investigations.

This exam will be based on the student's ability to evaluate a fundamental research article from the literature of chemical engineering. Specifically, the student will be asked to:
• Identify the problems addressed in the paper.
• Formulate a critical appraisal of the authors' contributions to the problem and the significance of the work.
• Critically evaluate the technical soundness of the approach used and results obtained.
• Summarize and critique advances in the field since the publication of the assigned article.
• Propose in concrete terms research work that might be done to extend and (if necessary) improve upon the study discussed in the article.
• Comment on the incorporation of the article's findings into the potential course of dissertation work of the student.

All students admitted to the Chemical or Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. programs will be required to take the doctoral qualifying examination at the first offering after completion of the core course ECH 5052 - Research Methods in Chemical Engineering.

Academic Regulations and Procedures

Selection of Course Plan
Selection of courses for the first semester should be done in consultation with the departmental graduate coordinator. All students must also register for the departmental seminar (BME/ECH 5935r, Chemical/Biomedical Engineering Seminar) every semester.

Selection of Major Professor
All full-time graduate students following the thesis or dissertation option are required to select a research topic and major professor by the end of the first term in which they enter the Department. A form for this purpose is available. T he completed form should be submitted to the departmental graduate coordinator.

The major professor is responsible for directing the student's research and progress toward a degree. Once a major professor has been approved, a supervisory committee should be established and a program of study prepared in consultation with the major professor before the end of the second term.

Supervisory Committee
The supervisory committee for a Master's degree candidate must consist of a minimum of three faculty members from student's home department with appropriate graduate directing status. The major professor is the chair of the supervisory committee and must be a faculty member from the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering. Additional members may be appointed to the committee if deemed desirable by the major professor.

The supervisory committee for a doctoral candidate must have four members (including major professor). All members must have appropriate graduate directive status. The major professor is the chair of the supervisory committee, must be a faculty member from the Department of Chemical & Biomedical Engineering, and must have appropriate graduate directive status. Two of the remaining members of the committee must be from the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, and the fourth member must be from outside the Department. Additional members may be appointed if deemed desirable. The final members of the committee must be approved by the Department Chair.

After the members of the supervisory committee have been identified, the supervisory committee assignment form should be completed and returned to the departmental graduate coordinator. This form will be placed in the student's permanent file.

Maintenance of Good Standing
In order to maintain good standing in the Department, the student must maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.0, with no more than one "C" grade for all of the courses. No more than one course with a "C" grade will be counted toward fulfilling the degree requirements. No grades below "C" will be counted toward degree requirements. Students without an undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering should obtain a grade of "B" or better in all required undergraduate courses.

Master's and doctoral degree students must submit the Graduate Student Progress Evaluation Form at the end of every Spring term for evaluation by the supervisory committee and graduate committee. A form for this purpose is included in the appendix of the graduate handbook. This form should be approved and signed by the major professor. An assessment of the progress of the student in research and courses by the graduate committee will be placed in the student's permanent file. Continuance of assistantships and/or tuition waivers is contingent upon satisfactory evaluations.

Time To Degree Completion
Students with undergraduate degrees in Chemical or Biomedical Engineering normally complete the thesis-type Master's program in four or five semesters, including one summer semester. The graduate committee will not normally recommend continuation of assistantships and tuition waivers beyond a period of two years subsequent to the student's admission to the Master's program. Students without an undergraduate degree in Chemical or Biomedical Engineering will be given one additional year for completion. However, these students are normally not supported during their first year, when they are primarily taking preparatory undergraduate chemical/biomedical engineering courses. Doctoral candidates will be recommended for departmental support only for a period of three years subsequent to being admitted to candidacy for the doctoral program. They may be supported on research grants after this period.

Assistantship Duties
Graduate student support is generally in the form of research or teaching assistantships (RAs or TAs), although University fellowships are also available. Research assistantships generally do not require the performance of any work beyond the research requirements of the degree. However, research assistants who receive departmental support for tuition waivers may be required to perform teaching assistant duties (TA) for classes. In addition, students will have to satisfy the teaching requirements of the degree (TA for one undergraduate laboratory course). Teaching assistantship duties include grading homework and/or exams, conducting problem-solving recitation sections and having office hours for answering student questions. Specific duties are assigned by the course instructor, but will typically require less than ten (10) hours per week.

University Doctoral Residency Requirements
The residency requirement for the Department of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering states that after having finished thirty (30) semester hours of graduate work or being awarded the Master's degree, the student must be enrolled continuously on either the FSU or FAMU Tallahassee campus for a minimum of twenty-four (24) graduate semester hours credit in any period of 12 consecutive months.

Graduate Courses

Definition of Prefixes
BME—Biomedical Engineering
ECH—Engineering: Chemical

Biomedical Engineering

BME 5620 Biophysical Chemistry and Biothermodinamics (3) Prerequisites: CHM 4410, CHM 4411, and ECH 3101. This course examines engineering thermodynamics and physical chemistry of living systems, as well as biochemical pH monitoring and analysis.
BME 5086 Biomedical Engineering Ethics (3) Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in Biomedical Engineering. This course is an introduction to the key theories, concepts, principles, and methodology relevant to the development of biomedical professional ethics. The student is facilitated in his/her development of a code of professional ethics through written work, class discussion and case analysis.
BME 5905r Directed Individual Study (1–3) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Detailed examination of some topic in biomedical engineering. Conducted on a personal basis with the instructor. A maximum of only three (3) semester hours can be used toward the MS or PhD. May be repeated to a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours.
BME 5910 Supervised Research (3) (S/U grade only.) Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Biomedical Engineering and instructor permission. Performance of research project required for the non-thesis MS degree.
BME 5935r Biomedical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Biomedical Engineering. Presentations by faculty, students, and visiting scientists. Full-time graduate students must enroll each term.
BME 5937r Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (3) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Detailed study of some topic of special interest to biomedical engineers. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours in the same term, as topics vary.
BME 5971r Thesis (1–9) (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Biomedical Engineering. Performance of research and preparation of the master’s thesis. May be repeated as often as approved by the department. A minimum of nine (9) semester hours must be counted toward the degree requirements.
BME 6530 NMR and MRI Methods in Biology and Medicine (3) Prerequisite: Doctoral candidate status in Biomedical Engineering. This course investigates MR imaging methods, spin echo methods, Bloch equations, proton diffusion, imaging, and microimaging NMR spectrometers in research.
BME 6938r Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (3) Prerequisites: Doctoral candidate status in Biomedical Engineering and instructor permission. Detailed study of some topic of special interest to biomedical engineers. May be repeated with different topics to a maximum of six (6) semester hours.
BME 6980r Dissertation (1–9) Prerequisite: Doctoral candidate status in Biomedical Engineering. Research on the dissertation topic. May be repeated as often as approved by the supervisory committee. A minimum of twenty-four (24) semester hours must be counted toward the degree requirements.
BME 8965r Doctoral Qualifying Exam (0) (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Doctoral candidate status in Biomedical Engineering. All doctoral students must enroll in this course the semester they intend to take the qualifying exam.
BME 8976 Thesis Defense (0) (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. All students must register for this course during the term that they intend to defend their thesis.
BME 8985 Dissertation Defense (0) (P/F grade only.) Prerequisites: Doctoral candidate status in Biomedical Engineering and instructor permission. This course must be included in the final semester schedule for all doctoral students.

Chemical Engineering

ECH 5052 Research Methods in Chemical Engineering (3) Course for first-term graduate students includes instruction in the performance of scientific research, including problem definition, literature review, project proposal development, laboratory and computational research, oral presentations, technical report writing, and professional conduct.
ECH 5126 Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I (3) Prerequisite: ECH 3101 or equivalent. Presents the fundamental aspects of classical thermodynamics, and its application to multicomponent, multiphase, and chemically reacting systems. Introduction to the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and statistical mechanics.
ECH 5261 Advanced Transport Phenomena I (3) Prerequisite: ECH 5842 or instructor permission. Development of the fundamental aspects of continuum mechanics in order to describe the transport of momentum, energy, and mass. The basic equations of fluid mechanics are developed, and a number of applications to chemical engineering problems are considered. Also emphasizes boundary conditions at phase interfaces, and derivation of the point and macroscopic balance equations for these transport processes.
ECH 5262 Advanced Transport Phenomena II (3) Prerequisite: ECH 5261. Rigorous analysis of transport phenomena at the micro- and macroscopic scales in systems with mixtures of several components and featuring more than one phase. Boundary layer flows, mixing effects, transport in porous and structured media, transport processes at interfaces.
ECH 5526 Advanced Reactor Design (3) Prerequisite: ECH 4504. A study of catalytic and noncatalytic reactor design for homogeneous and heterogeneous systems. Includes non-ideal flow and mixing, including distribution functions and modeling.
ECH 5828 Introduction to Polymer Science and Engineering (3) Corequisites: ECH 5126 and ECH 5526. This course explores the classification and characterization of polymeric systems. Topics include the introduction to the physical chemistry, synthesis and reaction kinetics, reaction engineering, characterization, and the processing and properties of polymeric systems.
ECH 5840 Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics I (3) Prerequisite: ECH 4403 and MAP 3305. This course is an introduction at the graduate level to the mathematical formulation and solution of chemical engineering problems involving transport phenomena and reaction. Course includes dimensional analysis and scaling, linear algebraic, ordinary, and partial differential equations, vector and tensor analysis, Fourier series, Integral (Fourier and Laplace) transforms, boundary value problems.
ECH 5841 Advanced Chemical Engineering Mathematics II (3) Prerequisite: ECH5840. Advanced mathematical techniques for chemical engineering applications presented within a unified framework of operator-theoretic methods. Green’s functions solution of partial differential equations, regular and singular perturbation techniques, boundary value problems, and boundary-element and finite-element techniques.
ECH 5852 Advanced Chemical Engineering Computations (3) Prerequisites: ECH 5841. Presentation of the central concepts of practical numerical analysis techniques and their application to chemical engineering problems. Includes interpolation and approximation theory, solution of linear and nonlinear systems, solution of ordinary differential and partial differential equations, single step and multi-step methods, stiff systems, and two-point boundary problems.
ECH 5905r Directed Individual Study (1–3) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Detailed examination of some topic in chemical engineering. Conducted on a personal basis with the instructor. May be repeated with different topics. Only three (3) semester hours may be used toward the MS degree.
ECH 5910 Supervised Research (3) (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Performance of research project required for the non-thesis MS degree.
ECH 5934r Special Topics in Chemical Engineering (3) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Detailed study of some topic of special interest to chemical engineers. Typical topics might include: aerosol mechanics, polymer processing, combustion, bioseparations, fluidization. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours with different topics. May be repeated in the same semester.
ECH 5935r Chemical Engineering Seminar (0) (S/U grade only.) Presentations by faculty, students, and visiting scientists. Full-time graduate students must enroll each term.
ECH 5971r Thesis (1–9) (S/U grade only.) Performance of research and preparation of master’s thesis. May be repeated as often as approved by the department. A minimum of nine (9) semester hours must be counted toward the degree requirements.
ECH 6272 Molecular Transport Phenomena (3) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Theory of transport phenomena from a molecular viewpoint. Classical concepts from statistical mechanics and derivation of the Boltzmann equation. The transport theory and properties of dilute gases are developed from the Boltzmann equation, with a more general treatment given for the case of liquids. A brief introduction to time correlation functions is presented.
ECH 6980r Dissertation (1–9) (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Doctoral candidate status. Research on the dissertation topic. May be repeated as often as approved by the supervisory committee. A minimum of twenty-four (24) semester hours must be counted toward the degree requirements.
ECH 8965r Doctoral Preliminary Exam (0) (P/F grade only.) All doctoral students must enroll in this course the semester they intend to take the qualifying exam.
ECH 8976 Thesis Defense (0) (P/F grade only.) Prerequisites: ECH 5126, ECH 5261, and ECH 5842. Corequisite: ECH 5971r. All students must register for this course during the term that they intend to defend their thesis.
ECH 8985 Dissertation Defense (0) (P/F grade only.) Corequisite: ECH 6980r. Must be included in the final semester schedule for all doctoral students.