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The School of Pharmacy was organized in 1951 as part of the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College (FAMC).  The thrust for pharmaceutical education at FAMC came from community health care leaders and health professionals on campus who saw the need for pharmaceutical services across the country.

The designation, College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, was made in 1985 in recognition of the expanded role and mission of the College in professional and graduate education.  The evolution of the College has witnessed the initiation of pharmacy education with just one student in the beginning to now being one of the largest colleges of pharmacy in the country.

The College has expanded its operations from the main campus located in the capital city of Florida; Tallahassee.  Extension campuses are located in Miami, Tampa and Jacksonville, Florida.  These campuses, all affiliated with a major teaching medical center, create outstanding clinical training opportunities for the student, provide unlimited opportunities for research and support the infrastructure for the College’s statewide commitment to pharmacy education and public service.

The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences is a professional college with limited enrollment and highly selective admissions.  The mission of the College is to produce highly qualified pharmacy practitioners who take an active role and responsibility in the delivery and outcomes of pharmaceutical care.

The dynamic changes that are occurring in the health systems of America demand a technologically literate, clinically trained, administratively prepared and caring health professional.  Pharmacy practitioners of the 21st century will participate in drug delivery to patients, coordinate therapeutic outcomes and monitor patient care.

Students who conscientiously apply themselves and successfully complete the pharmacy program will be technically trained, educated, and well-prepared to make significant contributions to the health care area in which they work.  The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences strives to educate and train pharmacists to use their scientific knowledge, problem solving and critical thinking skills to determine the best solution to the health care problems of today and the future.

NOTE:  The statements set forth in this section of the catalog are for information purposes only and should not be construed as the basis of a contract between a student and this institution.  While the provisions of this section will ordinarily be applied as stated, the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences reserves the right to change any provision listed in this section, including (but not limited to) academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to individual students.  Every effort will be made to keep students advised of any such changes.  However, it is especially important that each student note that it is his or her responsibility to keep himself or herself appraised of current graduation requirements by regular consultation with his or her advisor.  All admissions to the professional program of the College of Pharmacy, effective fall semester 1997, will be to the Doctor of Pharmacy program.  Students are alerted that a Student Handbook for the College is published annually and contains the details of the academic and matriculation policies of the College.

The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) is granted upon successful completion of the professional curriculum and compliance with the requirements of the College and University for graduation.
Graduate programs of study are offered leading to the Master of Science (MS) in pharmaceutical sciences with concentrations in pharmacology/toxicology, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacoepidemiology, and pharmacoeconomics.  The Master of Public Health (MPH) and Doctor of Public Health (Dr.PH) degrees are offered through the Institute of Public Health. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in pharmaceutical sciences is offered with concentrations in pharmacology/toxicology, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics or environmental toxicology.


Basic Sciences
Professors:  Ablordeppey, S;  Fitzgerald, T.;  Goodman, C.;  Holder, M.; Kolta. M.; Lewis, B.;  Oriaku, E.;  Palm, D.;  Reams, R.;  Redda, K.;  Sachdeva, M.;  Samaan, S.;  Soliman, K.; 
Associate Professors: 
Abonyo, B.;  Cooperwood, J.;  Kandamalla, K.;  Lamango, N.; 
Assistant Professors:  
Ardley, T.;  Darling-Reed, S.; Hernan, F.; Israel, B.;  Jackson, T.;  Spencer, S.

Pharmacy Practice
Professors:  Branch, E.; Honeywell, M.;  Kirksey, O.;  Lewis III, H.;  Massey-Hill, A.; Rappa, L.; Thompson, M.
Associate Professors:  Emanuel, F.;  Eraikhuemen, N.;  Ghazvini, P.; Jones, J.;  Larose-Pierre, M.;  Norwood, D.;  Scrivens, J.;  Simon, W.;  Singh, A.;Thomas, R. L.;     Thornton, A.
Assistant Professors:  Boozer, T.;  Colquitt, C.;  Devoe, J.;   Harrison, S.;  King, K.; Lewis, K.; Mahdavian, S.;  Martin, T.;  Pagan, L.;  Robertson, G.;  Scott, M.;  Seal, D.; 
Instructors: Bailey, C.;   Brickler, M.

Economic, Social and Administrative Pharmacy
Professor:  Xiao, H.
Associate Professors:  Barber, J.;  Campbell, E.
Assistant Professor:  Warren, C.

Public Health
Professors:  Brown, C.;  Harris, C.
Associate Professors:  Close, F.;  Kiros, G.;  Rahman, S.;  Suther, S.
Assistant Professors:  Ashford, A.; Becker, A.; Dark, T.;  Lee, T.;  Lopez, I.;     Wiltshire, J.

Limited Access Program
The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences’ Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD), a professional degree program, is among the limited access programs at Florida A&M University.  The College accepts students into this program during the fall semester only.  Acceptance at the first professional (third year of college) is determined by availability of space, not the size of the applicant pool.  Students admitted to the program maintain a slot as long as the required grade point average is maintained and adherence to the policies of the College and University are observed.  Students admitted to the professional program compete for positions at the first professional year level ONLY.

Accreditation
Florida A&M University’s Doctor of Pharmacy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education; 20 North Clark Street; Chicago, Illinois 60602; Telephone (312) 664-3575, (800) 553-3606; Fax (312) 664-4652. www.acpe-accredit.org.

Goals and Objectives
The College of Pharmacy recognizes its responsibility to prepare students for the professional and business aspects of community and hospital pharmacy practice and to provide a fundamental background for further study in other areas of the profession.  The curriculum is designed to equip the student for citizenship in the world of intellectual and moral responsibility based on a thorough knowledge of his or her own profession.  Specifically, the College of Pharmacy aims to:
I.      prepare students to enter the practice of pharmacy with competencies demanded by his or her role in health care and to provide breadth of scientific and professional background so as to allow versatility of
        practice within the subsystems of pharmacy practice;
II.     stimulate and nurture in the student the processes of intellectual creativity, imagination, curiosity, problem-solving, and public service;
III.    instill attitudes of professionalism and ideas for the cultivation of optimum execution of duties and responsibilities in rendering quality health care service;
IV.    develop knowledgeable appreciation of the pharmacist’s legal, ethical, moral and social responsibilities;
V.     convey a positive attitude about on-going and continuous updating of professional knowledge and competencies;
VI.    promote membership in professional organizations and learned societies as an integral part of competent growth and development; and
VII.   emphasize appropriate relationships with other health care professionals, especially with co-professionals on the health care team.
General Graduation Requirements
The following general requirements must be met for the Doctor of Pharmacy degree:
I.    Satisfactory completion of not less than 134 semester hours of university level upper-division professional course work for the doctor of pharmacy degree.
II.   The selection of a specialty area of study, if other than general practice, and the preparation of a program of study which is oriented toward a realistic educational objective with a clear professional purpose. 
      This program must be developed with and approved by the student’s advisor and filed with the Office of the Dean at the beginning of the upper-division professional program (3rd year of the undergraduate
      curriculum).
III.   Satisfactory completion of the minimum course work requirements prescribed below in the context of a program of study relating to specific specialty areas of emphasis. (The grade of ‘C’ or better is required in
       all pre-professional and professional courses.)
A.    Freshman English and humanities, six (6) hours each;
B.    Other general education courses as prescribed by the University;
C.    History, behavioral sciences-including sociology, psychology, geography, political science, and history of the U.S;
D.    Mathematics-six (6) hours of pre-calculus and calculus or more advanced equivalent.
E.    Biological sciences-eight  (8) hours, including zoology and botany or the equivalent.
F.     Physical sciences-twenty-four (24) hours, including general chemistry, qualitative analysis, organic chemistry, and physics. (Labs are required.)
G.    Minimum keyboard skills of 40 words per minute with acceptable error rate will be required of students prior to the second year of the professional curriculum.  The College of Pharmacy does not
        have a formal course in keyboard skills.
H.    Students must demonstrate competency on the comprehensive examination during the  senior year with minimum score of 75 prior to graduation.
I.     Students must complete 800-2000 contact hours of clerkship/internship training at a clinical site approved by the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.
J.     Completion of a minimum of 50 hours (200 total) per year of volunteer community service learning.
K.    All candidates for graduation must have been enrolled full time in the professional component of the curriculum of the College of Pharmacy for a minimum of eight (8) semesters regardless of the
       number of credit hours of study completed in other fields.
L.    Active membership in the Academy of Students of Pharmacy/Student National Pharmaceutical Association each academic year of enrollment in the College of Pharmacy.
Policies
Matriculation - The College has promulgated matriculation policies for the Doctor of Pharmacy program.  Due to dynamic forces impacting pharmacy professional practice direction, accreditation guidelines, peer academic consensus, standards of practice, licensure requirements, and other external, as well as in-house considerations, the College may implement curricular changes which are required not only of incoming students but also of the currently enrolled matriculate.  Students are admonished of their responsibility to avail themselves of these policies from the dean’s office and/or the academic notices bulletin board to keep abreast of these policies and any changes that may occur. An Academic Policy Handbook is printed annually to document these changes.

Sequence of Courses - The student is expected to enroll in and complete courses in sequence, adhering at each point to all prerequisites.  It is essential, then, that the student keep up with the progression of his or her course of study in order to stay in proper sequence to complete requirements on schedule.  No student is allowed to take courses out of sequence or without completing prerequisites; nor is the student permitted to enroll in an advanced level of sequential courses without having completed the lower level-course(s).  (i.e. All 3rd year courses must be completed before any 4th year courses are attempted).
Student Organizations- The College of Pharmacy has several active professional organizations and class organizations, each of which sponsors its own professional and social events.  All students are expected to participate actively in ASP/SNPHA and one or more of the other groups.

Class Attendance - Compulsory attendance to classes is demanded of all students in the College of Pharmacy.  In addition to the University’s mandatory class attendance policies, the College of Pharmacy has regulations regarding class attendance that are specific and are enforced by the faculty.  Students are alerted of the need to familiarize themselves with the academic consequences of failure to comply with mandatory class attendance.

Dress Code - Students are required to subscribe to the dress code promulgated jointly by the faculty and students.  Faculty members enforce this dress code in the classroom and laboratory and during clinical experiences as an integral part of the training of student professionals.  The student has a responsibility to adhere to the dress code.

Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium - Students are required to attend the pharmacy forum and colloquium series each semester of enrollment in didactic courses.  Attendance and participation is mandatory.  Failure to participate will result in receipt of a failing grade and must be repeated prior to graduation.

Advisors - Advisement is a continuous and active process in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  Each student is assigned to an advisor for advisement on matters relative to the student’s academic program and professional activities.  The advisor should be the student’s first line of communication in addressing academic, professional, and/or other perceived problems.  The advisor will maintain a record of advisement activities for each student.

Graduation Competency - The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences’ administration and faculty recognize their responsibility to graduate only the student whom they judge to be ready to accept the challenges of the pharmacy profession academically, ethically, and professionally.  Consequently, the dean of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, upon recommendation of an appropriate committee or the faculty,  reserves the right to withhold the recommendation for graduation of any student who does not conform to these expectations.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences - The professional programs in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have as part of their academic requirements an externship experience.  The experiences vary in length and may occur away from the University site in Tallahassee.  Students are advised that they will be required to relocate to the city of the clerkship/externship experience site.  Each student is expected to assume responsibility for all costs associated with the clerkship/externship experiences required for graduation.

Clinical Experiences - The professional programs in the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences have as part of their academic requirements a clinical experience.  The experiences vary in length and most occur away from the University site in Tallahassee.  Students are advised that they will be required to relocate to the city of the clinical experience site.  Each student is expected to assume responsibility for all costs associated with the clinical experiences required for graduation.

Career Opportunities
The profession of pharmacy offers a wide range of career opportunities that are limited only by the imagination and motivation of the person involved.  The profession also offers great flexibility in choosing an area of practice that is both challenging and satisfying.

Graduates of the College have found outstanding professional positions in chain drugstores, community pharmacies, hospitals, academics, and clinical practice settings such as clinics, nursing homes and ambulatory centers.  Outstanding career opportunities are also available with pharmaceutical manufacturing companies, the federal government,  military and veteran facilities,  as  well as regulatory drug affairs.  Positions for pharmacists can also be found in managed care organizations, insurance companies and other third-party providers.  Career placement opportunities will be made available to the student during matriculation.

Specific information pertaining to entry and graduation requirements may be obtained by writing the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Office of Pharmacy Student Affairs,  Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32307-3800.

Registered Pharmacist Licensure (Florida)
Licensure as a registered pharmacist is available to graduates of the pharmacy curriculum at the Florida A&M University College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, by examination in all states and in the District of Columbia.

Additional information concerning licensure in Florida may be obtained by writing the Florida Board of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 6330, Tallahassee, Florida 32314-6330.


Doctor of Pharmacy Degree

The fundamental goal of the Doctor of Pharmacy Program at Florida A&M University is to provide a combined academic and clinical experience for pharmacy students whose abilities and career aspirations suggest potential for innovative leadership roles in professional pharmacy practice.

The major emphasis in the academic portion of the Doctor of Pharmacy Program is therapeutics and pharmacokinetics.  Other areas of study include biostatistics, patient care, drug literature evaluation, clinical pharmacology, laboratory medicine, and clinical research.  Candidates may elect courses in advanced toxicology, neuro-pharmacology, endocrine pharmacology, sociological aspects of health care, special research, and any of a number of other approved electives.

Through a series of clinical clerkships, covering approximately 1,500 hours, candidates receive training in general medicine, psychiatry, pediatrics, ambulatory care and elective drug rotations. Advanced clinical clerkship sites require candidates to transfer to Miami, Jacksonville, or Tampa, Florida, after completion of the academic portion in Tallahassee, for the final year of training.

Curriculum Notice
The College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences is currently undergoing an extensive curriculum revision, effective Fall 2008. Academic announcements of these changes will be made available in a timely fashion to allow students to prepare and register for the appropriate revised courses in consultation with their academic advisors.

Pre-Professional Core Curriculum
 Fall Semester (Year 1)
 Sem. Hrs.
CHM 1045/L General Chemistry  I (Lab)4
MAC 1147 Precalculus4
ENC 1101 Freshman Communication Skills I3
AMH 2091 Afro-American History  or   AFA  3104  A. American Experience   3
BSC  1010/L General Biology I (Lab)    4
PHA 1880 Pharmacy Forum & Colloquium 1

 0
 Total 18
  
 Spring Semester
  Sem. Hrs.
CHM 1046/L General Chemistry II (Lab) 4
MAC 2311 Calculus 4
ENC 11 02 Freshman Communication Skills II 3
CGS 2060 Computer Literacy I 3
BSC 1011/L General Biology II (Lab)    4
PHA 1881 Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium II

 0
 Total 18
  
 Fall Semester (Year 2)
Sem. Hrs.
CHM 2210/L Organic Chemistry I (Lab)  4
PHY  2053/L  College Physics I (Lab) 4
Social Science Elective  3
Humanities Elective I 3
BSC  2093/L Anatomy & Physiology I (Lab) 4
PHA  2882  Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium III

 0
 Total 18
  
 Spring Semester  Sem. Hrs.
CHM 2211/L Organic Chemistry II (Lab)  4
PHY 2054/L College Physics II (Lab) 4
General Elective 3
Humanities Elective II3
BSC  2094/L Anatomy & Physiology II (Lab)4
 PHA  2883  Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium IV

 0
  Total 18

 

Gordon Rule Requirements (FAMU Catalog - Page 54)

Communications (6 hours)        = Freshman Communications I, II (Enc 1101, 1102)
Mathematics (6 hours)              = Precalculus and Calculus (MAC 1147, 2311)   
Humanities (6 hours)                 = Humanities Electives I, II (HUM (2 courses))
Social Science (6 hours)           = African American History or the African American Experience (required)
                                                    and one Social Science Elective (AMH 2091 or AFA 3104 and SSE)
Natural Science (8 hours)        = Biology I, II (BSC 1010, 1011)
General Elective (3-4 hours)    = Gen. Elective (GE)
Total Hours                               = 35-36 hours






Professional Curriculum

First Professional Year
 Fall Semester (Year 3)
 Sem. Hrs.
 PHA  3426 Physiological Chemistry and Drug Analysis3
 PHA 3110 Pharmaceutics I 3
PHA  3110L Pharmaceutics I Lab 1
 PHA  3581 Pathophysiology 5
 PHA  3790 Drug Information for Pharmacists 1
PHA  3000C Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) I2
PHA  3800 Pharmaceutical Calculations I1
 PHA  3884 Pharmacy  Forum and Colloquium V

 0
 Total 16
  
 Spring Semester  Sem. Hrs.
 PHA 3751 Microbiology & Immunology 3
 PHA 3111 Pharmaceutics II 3
 PHA 3111 Pharmaceutics II Lab 1
PHA  3571 Introduction to Principles of Drug Action 3
PHA  3785 Clinical Patient Assessment 3
PHA  3002C Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) II2
PHA  3801 Pharmaceutical Calculations II 1
 PHA  3885 Pharmacy  Forum and Colloquium VI

 0
 Total 16


Second Professional Year

 Fall Semester (Year 4)
 Sem. Hrs.
 PHA  4572 Principles of Drug Action I 6
 PHA  4572L Principles of Drug Action I Lab 1
 PHA  4120 Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics 4
 PHA  4724 Health Care Systems & Behavior 2
 PHA  4723  Introduction to Public Health 2
 PHA  4886  Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium VII

 0
 Total15
  
 Spring Semester
Sem. Hrs.
 PHA  4573 Principles of Drug Action II 6
 PHA  4573L Principles of Drug Action  II Lab 1
 PHA  4126 Clinical Pharmacokinetics 3
 PHA  4210 Pharmacy Management 3
 PHA  4210L Pharmacy Management Lab 1
 PHA  4231 Jurisprudence & Ethics I1
 PHA  4769 Self Care and Therapeutics2
 PHA  4887 Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium

 0
 Total17
  
Summer - (Third Professional Year)
IPPE (Summer Experience) (160 Hours)

Third Professional Year
 
 Fall Semester (Year 5)
Sem. Hrs.
 PHA  5615 Medication Therapy Management I 5
 PHA 5615L Medication Therapy Management I Lab 1
 PHA  5212 Evidence-Based Medicine    3
PHA  5746 Patient Counseling 2
 PHA  5234 Jurisprudence & Ethics II    1
 Elective I V
 PHA  5005C Initial Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) III 2
 PHA  5888  Pharmacy Forum and Colloquium IX

 0
 Total 16/17
  
 Spring Semester
Sem. Hrs. 
 PHA  5617 Medication Therapy Management II 5
 PHA  5617L  Medication Therapy Management II Lab 1
 PHA  5285 Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics  2
 PHA  5103 Principles of Medication Dispensing and Compounding    2
 PHA  5103L Principles of Medication Dispensing and Compounding Lab 1
 PHA  5810 Applied Immunology 2
 Elective II                   V
 PHA  5006C Initial Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) IV 2
 PHA  5889 Pharmacy  Forum and Colloquium X

 0
 Total17/18
  
Fourth Professional Year (Year 6)
 
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (nine one-month experiences)36
PHA  5917 Seminar and Research Methods I                      1
PHA  5918 Seminar and Research Methods II                       1
PHA  5919 Seminar and Research Methods III1
Total39
TOTAL DEGREE HOURS208

Fourth Professional Year Breakdown
 
APPE Summer  Semester  (Year 6)
 Sem. Hrs.
 PHA  5917 Seminar and Research Methods I 1
 PHA  5627 Health Systems (Community)    4
 PHA  5626 Health  Systems (Hospital)    4
 PHA  5694 Medicine I 4
 PHA  5695 Medicine II 4
 PHA  5692 Ambulatory Care I                            4
 PHA  5676 Ambulatory Care II    4
 Elective    4
 Elective    4
 Elective   

 4
 Total37
  
APPE Fall  Semester  
 PHA  5918 Seminar and Research Methods II   4
PHA  5627 Health Systems (Community)4
PHA  5626 Health Systems (Hospital)   4
PHA  5694 Medicine I4
PHA  5695 Medicine II4
PHA  5692 Ambulatory Care I4
PHA  5676 Ambulatory Care II4
 Elective  4
 Elective  4
 Elective  
___________________________________________________________________
 
4
Total40
  
APPE Spring Semester  
PHA  5919 Seminar and Research Methods III   4
PHA  5627 Health  Systems (Community)4
PHA  5626 Health Systems (Hospital)   4
PHA  5694 Medicine I4
PHA  5695 Medicine II4
PHA  5692 Ambulatory Care I4
PHA  5676 Ambulatory Care II   4
Elective4
Elective4
Elective
___________________________________________________________________
4
Total40






Course Descriptions

PHA 1880, 1881, 2882, & 2883 Pharmacy “Professional Development” Forum (Pre-Professional) I, II, III and IV (0) A colloquium that assesses pharmacy as a profession and discusses major professional organizations, components of the curriculum and professional practice options. One (1) hour per week.

PHA 3000C Initial Pharmacy Practice Experience I (2) Introduction of student to the various areas of pharmacy practice such as retail, hospital, nursing home, home health and industry.  Educational requirements, specific responsibilities of the pharmacist, legal implications and interdisciplinary relationships discussed.  One (1) hour of lecture and two (2) hours of practice a week.

PHA 3002C Initial Pharmacy Practice Experience II (2) This course will introduce the student to the theories and applications of professional communications.  In addition to the didactic component, the course is linked to the Introductory Pharmacy Professional Communications Laboratory Experience which will provide the opportunity to improve both oral and written communications skills.  One (1) hour of lecture and two (2) hours of practice per week. 

PHA 3110 Pharmaceutics I (3) Prereq: CHM 3211, PHY 3004.  Pharmaceutical dosage forms theory, technology, formulation, evaluation, and dispensing.  Calculations and methodology emphasized.  Three (3) lecture hours per week.

PHA 3110L Pharmaceutics I Laboratory (2) Coreq: PHA 3110. Laboratory accompaniment of Pharmaceutics 1. Six (6) hours per week.

PHA 3111 Pharmaceutics II (3) Prereq: PHA 3110. Continuation of PHA 3110. Three (3) hours lecture per week.

PHA 3111L Pharmaceutics II Laboratory (1) Coreq: PHA 3111. Laboratory accompaniment of Pharmaceutics 11.  Three (3) hours per week.

PHA 3426 Physiological Chemistry & Drug Analysis  (3) Prereq: Introduction to chemistry and metabolism of cellular constituents and drugs with emphasis on enzymes and hormones in metabolic process.  Three (3) hours lecture per week.

PHA 3571 Introduction to Principles of Drug Action (3) Functional groups, stereochemistry, and physiochemical characteristics are emphasized to provide a solid foundation of drug molecular structure, absorption, distribution, metabolic transformation and excretion and the relationship to pharmacodynamic and therapeutic aspects of drug action.  This information provides correlation with mechanisms of action related to therapeutic and side effects of drugs.  Three (3) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 3581, Pathophysiology (5) Prereq.  PHA3580. Concurrent enrollment in PHA 3450.  Effect of disease on normal physiologic function of various organ systems throughout the body.  Specific emphasis on physiologic alterations of organ systems presented.  Five (5) hours lecture per week.

PHA 3751 Medical Microbiology and Immunology (3) Prereq: CHM 3211. Fundamental principles underlying activities of microorganisms.  Special emphasis on pathogenic bacteria, viruses, etc.; their pathogenicity, symptomology, host-parasite relationship, prevention, and treatment.  Two  (2) hour lecture/demonstration per week.

PHA 3800 Pharmaceutical Calculations I (1) Pharmaceutical calculations encompasses calculations performed by the pharmacist in traditional as well as specialized  practice settings.  In addition, physiochemical aspects affecting formulation of solid dosage forms with emphasis on controlled release formulations and the techniques used to achieve them are presented.  Factors affecting absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs, bioequivalency and dosage form design  are covered. Introduction to biopharmaceutics and bioavailability.  One (1) hour of lecture per week

PHA 3801 Pharmaceutical Calculations II (1) Prereq: PHA 3800   Continuation of  PHA 3800.  One (1) hour lecture per week.

PHA 3884, 3885, 4886, 4887, 5888 & 5889 Pharmacy  “Professional Development” Forum III, IV, V, VI, VII and VIII (0) A colloquium involving speakers, informational presentations and discussions presented by invited participants. One (1) hour per week.

PHA 5103, Principles of Medication Dispensing and Compounding. (32 Prereq: Completion of semester 9 course work.  Interpretation and evaluation of prescription orders, including compounding, dispensing and education of patients receiving prescribed therapy.  Various types of prescription orders including oral, parenteral and topical therapies are prepared.  Specific emphasis on evaluating preparation technique, analysis of the prescription for completeness, drug-interactions and appropriateness of therapy, labeling as well as the ethical and legal principles involved with the drug preparation and dispensing process.

PHA 5103, Principles of Medication Dispensing and Compounding Laboratory (1) Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in Principles of Medication Dispensing and Compounding.  Laboratory accompaniment of lecture course.  Three (3) hours per week.

PHA 4120 Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics (4) Prereq: PHA 3581.  Clinically functional, mathematical approach to design of dose regimen, especially in renal and hepatic impairment.  Also drug bioavailability in therapeutic optimization.  Four (4) hours lecture per week.

PHA 4126 Clinical Pharmacokinetics (3) Prereq: PHA 4120.  Primary focus on clinically functional approach to design of dose regiments, including special problems due to hepatic and renal functional impairment, drug interactions, and immaturity of enzyme systems.

PHA 4210, 4210L Pharmacy Management of Health Care System (4) Prereq: Completion of P1 year. Developing and managing community pharmacy prototypes; introduction to basic management principles and methods; entrepreneurial, social and economic aspects of practice.  Three (3) hour lecture per week. Two (2) hours lab per week.

PHA 4724 Pharmacy Health Care & Behavior (4) Social Economic and behavioral fundamentals of health care and pharmacy practice in particular.

PHA 5775  Gerontology and Nutrition
(3) Prerequisite:  Enrollment in Semesters 9/10.  A course designed to explore major diseases experienced in the geriatric population and effective therapeutic management.  Considerations for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes in the elderly.

PHA 4769 Self-Care Therapeutics
(2) Professional and pharmacological aspects of non-prescription medications.  Patient counseling and management of disease states.  Product selection.

PHA 4905 Directed Individual Study
(2-5) Prereq: Consent of instructor.

PHA 5566 Cardiovascular Wellness and Prevention (3) Prerequisite: Enrollment Semesters9/10.  Course designed to explore and present the factors and lifestyle changes required to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

PHA 5601 Pediatric Ambulatory Care
(3) Prerequisite: Enrollment in Semesters 9/10.  Pharmacotherapeutic management of selected diseases in pediatric patients encountered in ambulatory settings.

PHA 5602 Pediatric Pharmacotherapy in the Acute Care Setting
(3) Prerequisite: Enrollment Semesters 9/10.  Review of pharmacotherapeutic management of various disease states encountered in pediatrics as seen in the acute care setting.

PHA 5626, 5627, 5651, 5652, 5653, 5681, 5676, 5692, 5694, 5695, 5696, 5697, 5698 Clinical Clerkships I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII. Each candidate is required to complete full-time rotations in each of the following: psychiatry, internal medicine, pediatrics, drug information, ambulatory care.

PHA 5746, Patient Counseling (2) Prereq: Completion of P2 year course work. Techniques and problems involved with counseling patients presented.  Counseling suggestions for all major dosage forms and drug classes are presented.

PHA 5768 Alternative Medicine
(2) This course will allow students to learn about the medicinal uses of alternative medicine, the role of the pharmacist in educating consumers about alternative medicine, and the risks and benefits associated with alternative medicine.

PHA 5786 Patient Assessment Skills
(3) Designed to develop knowledge in clinical methods of evaluation, data collection and interpretation.  Techniques of patient interviewing, charting, medication profiling, and patient advisement will be covered.

PHA 5794  Drug Information Systems
(1) & Drug Literature Evaluation (1) Sem. 9 & 10.  Review of principles and techniques employed in evaluation of clinical literature with emphasis on effective use of available literature sources.  The types of drug information centers,  the operation, and management of a drug information center with emphasis on the retrieval systems utilized.

PHA 5810 Applied Immunology
(2) A study of the basic principles of immunology, including antigen-antibody reactions, humoral immunity, and hypersensitivity reactions, as well as the immunopathology of selected disease complexes.

PHA 4231 Pharmacy Jurisprudence and Ethics I (1)  This course will introduce  the  pharmacy student to the various ethics, moralities and laws governing the practice of pharmacy.  Classroom discussions and case presentations will be a large portion of the overall course.  After completion of the course students will be able to apply certain legal and ethical facts to pharmaceutical situations.  This course will focus on Florida law.  One (1) hour lecture per week.

PHA 4572 Principles of Drug Action I
(6)  In this course a solid foundation is established for understanding the pharmacotherapeutic effects of drugs and how they  are utilized in disease intervention.  Functional groups, stereochemistry, physiochemical characteristics  are correlated with pharmacodynamic and therapeutic aspects of drug action. These concepts provide an integrated comprehension of drug mechanisms of action which underlie therapeutic  applications, side effects, contraindications and interactions of contemporary drug agents.  Six (6) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 4572L Principles of Drug Action I Lab (1)  Designed for group presentation and discussion of cases and problems related to clinical use of drugs presented in PDA lecture course.  Students will learn how to integrate pharmacology and medicinal chemistry concepts with therapeutics and will be taught how to think critically in order to implement, evaluate and solve problems related to drug therapy as a pharmacist. Two (2) hours of laboratory session per week.

PHA 4573 Principles of Drug Action II (6) Continuation of PHA 4572. Six (6) hours of  lecture per week.

PHA 4573L Principles of Drug Action II Lab (1) Continuation of PHA 4572L Two (2)
hours of laboratory session per week. 

PHA 4723 Introduction to Public Health in Pharmacy
(2) The course provides a comprehensive examination of the basic and critical issues in public health for pharmacists.  The course content includes a basic knowledge base of public health issues, an exploration of the various roles that pharmacy can provide in offering public health services, and examples of application to pharmacy practice.  Issues in public health care are examined from both the pharmacy perspective and the traditional public health viewpoint.  Two (2) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 5005C Initial Pharmacy Practice Experience III (2) Prereq.: completion of 160 hours of Summer Experience. Coreq.: enrollment in PHA 5746.  This course is designed  to provide the students with the necessary skills needed to per form clinically oriented activities such as case presentations, journal clubs, and drug literature evaluation.  This course will utilize actual patients from the Family and Friends Project presented in Patient Counseling (PHA 5746) to follow-up on and do case presentations, journal clubs drug information questions relating to the same patients and provide pharmaceutical care through health fairs in the spring as well. Two (2) contact hours per week.

PHA 5006C Initial Pharmacy Practice Experience IV (2)  This course is designed to provide students with the necessary skills needed to perform clinically oriented activities such as case presentations, journal clubs, and drug literature evaluation.  Introductory Pharmacy Practice III (IPPE III) will take place in the P3 year for a total of 76 hours.  This course (IPPE IV) is designed to utilize actual patients from the Family and Friends Project presented in the Patient Counseling Class in the Fall of P3 year (50 hours) to follow up on and do ca se presentations, journal clubs, drug information questions relating to the same patients and provide pharmaceutical care through health fairs in the Spring semester as well (26 hours).  Two (2) contact hours per week.

PHA 5212 Evidence-Based Medicine
(3) Evidenced Based Medicine (EBM) is considered the process of integrating evidence available from clinical trials and the biomedical literature with clinical expertise to make the best clinical decisions. This course is designed to teach the skills required to apply this method of learning in preventative medicine, quality improvement , patient safety, and clinical therapeutics.  The critical evaluation of the recent medical and pharmacotherapeutic literature  will be the focus of this course.

PHA 5234 Pharmacy Jurisprudence and Ethics II (1) This course will introduce the pharmacy student to the various ethic, moralities and laws governing the practice of pharmacy.  Classroom discussions and case presentations will be a large portion of the overall course.  After completion  of the course students will be able to apply certain legal and ethical facts to pharmaceutical situations.  This  course will focus on federal laws.  One (1) hour of lecture per week.

PHA 5285 Principles of Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmacoepidemiology
(2) This course presents the theory and application of pharmacoeconomic analysis and pharmacoepidemiology within pharmacy practice. Two (2) hours of lecture per week.

PHA  5600 Concepts in Clinical Oncology (2) This course will provide information about the pathophysiology of common oncology disorders and  present standard therapies for treating these disorders.  Emphasis will be placed on designing appropriate regimens, defining therapeutic goals, monitoring clinical and laboratory parameters, and identifying drug interactions and adverse reactions. Two hours of lecture per week. 

PHA 5615 Medication Therapy Management I (5) Students are provided with the principles of pharmacotherapeutics to be utilized when providing medication therapy management for patients with various disease and /or combinations of diseases.  Specific emphasis on developing a medication treatment plan, communication, implementation and monitoring the medication plan is stressed.  Pertinent patient and provider education to achieve positive therapeutic outcomes is provided.  Five (5) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 5615L Medication Therapy Management I Lab (1) Students develop necessary skills required to provide medication therapy management services.  The focus of the lab is skill development and will include the use of technology to emphasize how to utilize concepts learned in didactic courses to provide medication therapy management to patients and providers when managing a wide variety of disease and clinical situations.   Two (2) hours of laboratory session per week.

PHA 5617 Medication Therapy Management II
(5) Continuation of PHA 5615. Five (5) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 5617 Medication Therapy Management II Lab
(1) Continuation of PHA 5615L. Two (2) hours of laboratory session per week.

PHA 5676 Advanced Medication Therapy Management (4) Prerequisite: Successful completion of didactic course work.  The MTM rotation is designed to provide the student with general knowledge regarding various issues surrounding the development and implementation of MTM services.  This rotation also assists in developing the students’ skills in pharmacotherapy, verbal and written communications, drug nformation as they apply to the area of MTM. Four (4) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 5897 Patents and Advanced Legal Issues in Pharmacy Practice (2) This course will in crease understanding of several advanced legal topics in pharmacy practice for students planning to work for pharmaceutical companies, the FDA or retail stores.  The course will cover Patents and the Orange Book, OBRA-90, HIPAA & Medication Therapy Management, the Dietary Supplement Health Education  Act, Consultant Pharmacist Liability, Pharmaceutical Qui Tam Actions, Off-Label Use and Marketing of Prescription Drugs, A Pharmacist’s Duty to Warn, A Pharmacist’s right to Choose and other relevant laws impacting pharmacy practice. Two (2) hours of lecture per week.

PHA 5917L, 5918L, and 5919L (1,1,1)  This course is intended to provide students with communication and research skills designed to supplement clinical clerkship training.  Weekly discussion of current topics of interest in the area of clinical pharmacy will be presented by faculty, students, and invited outside lecturers.  Emphasis is placed on research design, proposal writing, IRB submission, abstract and manuscript preparation.   Two (2) contact hours per week.

SPN 3033 Spanish for Pharmacists and Health Professionals I (3) An Intensive Spanish oral-aural approach to Spanish for students with no previous training in the language.  The student will be able to apply functional language communication skills by using specialized terminology in his/her area related with pharmacy program.  Students, whether professionals already working in the field or career/goal – oriented students in an occupational training program, are presented key vocabulary in a comprehensible input format, focusing on easily mastered core expressions.  Photographs and brief dialogues, supported by brief grammar explanations, reinforce needed terms.  In class, students will practice communicative survival using key vocabulary essential to each context to enable them to utilize their Spanish in the real world at work.

SPN 3034 Spanish for Pharmacists and Health Professionals II
(3) Prereq. HSC XXXX.  This is a continuation course.  The student will be able to apply functional language communication skills, speak, read, and write sample standard themes in his/her area of specialization.  Advanced Grammar will be integrated into the learning process.  Students will focus on communicative survival using essential vocabulary to the topic to enable them to utilize their Spanish in the real world of their job environment.