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Civil and Environmental Engineering

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering Admission
Requirements for the Ph.D.Degree in Civil Engineering
Graduate Course Listing according to Areas of Concentration
Graduate Course Description


Description.

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs with concentrations in structural, geotechnical, transportation, water resources and environmental engineering. Special areas of emphasis are bridge design, coastal construction, structural analysis and stability; geotextiles, pavements, and soil dynamics; transportation networks and multimodel systems; storm water, water resources management, hazardous waste and solid waste management; and computer aided design, planning, and decision support. The programs of study are flexible and depend on the background and objectives of each individual student who may specialize in any of the several areas of concentration mentioned above. Students receive a broad-based understanding of engineering and science and gain fundamental contemporary capabilities in an area of concentration necessary to conduct significant and original scholarly research. Each specific Ph.D. program of study is uniquely tailored through consultation with a major professor and supervisory committee that a student selects.

Research Laboratories.
The college has many instructional and research laboratories. Specific laboratories for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering are geotechnical, environmental, hydraulic, pavement, construction materials, structures, the traffic automation and innovation laboratory (TRAIL) and transportation engineering laboratory.

Geotechnical laboratory facilities include equipment for soil classification, compaction, hydraulic conductivity, slurry evaluation, shear strength, and compressibility of soils. Electronic data acquisition systems, personal computers, sampling devices, and a machine shop are also available for student use.

The environmental engineering laboratories include both an undergraduate teaching lab and a graduate research lab. The facilities include equipment and instrumentation needed for physical and chemical analysis of water quality, sampling and filtering devices, and space for bench scale experiments.

The hydraulic laboratory is used by students to reinforce the basic concepts of hydraulics to become familiar with hydraulic equipment and instrumentation, and to learn procedures of data collection and analysis. Students can perform experiments for hydrostatic pressure, hydrostatic forces on submerged bodies, flow measurement, friction in pipe flow, pump power, open channel flow, hydraulic jump, and wave mechanics.

Pavement laboratory facilities include equipment for resilient modulus characterization of highway materials (MTS Load System, TestStar Control Unit, Triaxial Testing System, and Compaction Set). Electronic data acquisition systems, PC computers, and pavement engineering software systems are available for research and instructional use.

Construction materials laboratory facilities include equipment for compression strength testing, concrete, mixer, MTS shock tester, L.A. abrasion test machine, and MTS test system.
A structures lab, two stories high, has a three-foot reinforced concrete reaction slab with 100-kip anchorage pods spaced at four-foot intervals. This facility provides undergraduate and graduate students with applied instruction on specialized testing of materials and structures, support for high quality research in developing and testing innovative structural systems for bridges, buildings, etc. The laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art vertical and lateral loading systems, together with automated data acquisition systems.

Computer resources.
Students have access to a large number and variety of computer systems. A network is available of nearly 700 computing devices for the academic and research efforts of the college.
The department houses the Crashworthiness and Impact Analysis Laboratory, which is well equipped with the most current, high performance computing environment in order to conduct transportation related research. The equipment includes a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 technical server with 16 parallel processors and a cluster of workstations for fast visualization and pre- and post-processing. This advanced computing environment is available primarily to graduate students working as research assistants with department faculty members.

The college computers are connected to a high-speed, switched, fiber-optic LAN and to the Internet via the FSU connection to the NSF v BNS network. Desktop computers are supported by a cluster of Sun, DEC, and SCI servers. Other nearby resources include the Supercomputer Computations Research Institute (SCRI), FAMU Computing Services, and FSU Academic Computing and Network Services (ACNS).

Assistantships.
Teaching and research assistantships are available on a competitive basis. Students who have teaching assistantships supervise laboratory courses, conduct tutorial sessions, and grade homework assignments. Research assistants work on externally sponsored research projects under the supervision of a faculty member. Letters of recommendation, evidence of communication skills, as well as GRE scores, are important considerations in the award of assistantships.

Annual stipends range from $10,000 to $16,000 for 20-hours of work per week during the academic year. A full time course load is nine (9) hours for students with at least a quarter-time (10 hour) assistantship and twelve (12) hours for those who do not have an assistantship. Out-of-state tuition and matriculation fee waivers are available on a competitive basis and on the availability of department funds for graduate assistants.

Correspondence and Information.
For information concerning financial aid, research facilities, or any question on degree requirements, you may contact the graduate program coordinator, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, Florida 32310-6046. For applications, you may contact Florida A & M University Admissions. See our web site at www.eng.fsu.edu.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree in Civil Engineering Admission.
An applicant to the program should have a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering, environmental engineering, or closely allied field. The applicant must have a B average (3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale) in upper level course work preceding the award of the B.S. degree and have a combined score of 1000 or above in the verbal and quantitative components of the general test of the Graduate Record Examination. Foreign applicants are required to meet the above requirements in addition to obtaining a score of at least 550 on the regular Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 213 on the computer based test or 80 on the internet based test.

Applications are considered year-round but should be submitted by July 1 for fall enrollment. International students should apply prior to May 1 to allow time for visa and related procedures. Applicants holding degrees in areas other than civil engineering or closely allied fields will be required to successfully complete preparatory undergraduate engineering articulation courses prior to beginning advanced work.

The thesis option requires 24 credit hours of course work and 6 credit hours of thesis work. A non-thesis option requires 30 credit hours of course work and 3 credit hours of advanced design project work. Both options require a final oral examination in which the student defends a thesis or project. The general course requirements include 3 hours of advanced mathematics, 15-24 hours in an area of concentration, and 6-9 hours of related electives. A maximum 6 hours of graduate course work in civil or environmental engineering in which the student earned a grade of B or better may be transferred from another university. Students are required to enroll and attend a majority of the Graduate Seminar courses offered biweekly. Each student’s program is designed with the approval of a major advisor.

Graduation requirements include a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better and the successful defense of a thesis or project report. All of the above requirements must be met within 7 calendar years.

Candidates who do not have an undergraduate degree in civil engineering, environmental engineering, or a closely related field will be required to take the following articulation courses as a minimum.

Civil Engineering Articulation Courses
EGN 3311 Civil Engineering Mechanics 4
EGN 3311 Strength of Materials 3
CES 3100 Structural Analysis I 4
CCE 3101 Construction Materials with Lab 4
CEG 3011 Soil Mechanics 3
TTE 3004 Transportation Engineering 3
EES 3040 Intro. to Env. Eng. Science with Lab 4
  
Environmental Engineering Articulation Courses  
EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics 4
EML 3100 Thermodynamics 2
CWR 3201 Hydraulics 3
CEG 3011 Soil Mechanics 3
EES 2205C Environmental Engineering Chemistry 4
ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering 
CWR 4101 Hydrology 3
(or) CWR 4202 Hydraulic Engineering I 3

Requirements for the Ph.D.Degree in Civil Engineering

Admission.
Students applying for admission to the Ph.D. program in civil or environmental engineering need to fulfill the department requirements for an M.S. degree in civil or environmental engineering or a closely allied engineering discipline from an accredited college or university. The applicant must have a grade point average of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale on all upper level undergraduate work and a minimum score of 1100 or better on the combined verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Record Examination. Foreign applicants are required to meet the above requirements with a degree from a recognized non-U.S. academic institution in addition to obtaining a score of at least 550 on the regular Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 213 on the computer based test or 80 on the internet based test. An applicant must also submit three letters of recommendation from academics or professionals attesting to the applicant’s graduate studies potential and an essay of intent providing goals and reasons for pursuing a Ph.D. degree. The Graduate Committee interviews all prospective students. This interview may be waived under extenuating circumstances.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements.
The course requirements for the Ph.D. degree in civil and environmental engineering are flexible and depend on the background and objectives of individual students. A student may specialize in any of the several areas of concentration within the department. In additional to the courses in the concentration area, the student must have a minor consisting of at least nine credit hours from an area outside the department. Students are required to enroll and attend a majority of the Graduate Seminar courses offered biweekly. Two Directed Individual Study (DIS) courses are allowed in the Ph.D. program. Each student’s specific program of study is uniquely tailored through consultation with a supervisory committee that the student selects. The objectives of course selection are to develop a broad-based understanding of engineering and science and to gain advanced contemporary capabilities in an area of concentration necessary to conduct significant and original scholarly research.

Before being admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, a student must fulfill the department requirements for the Master’s degree or its equivalent. Students are required to pass the Doctoral Preliminary Examination, usually taken during the second semester of the program, if a student enters the program with an MS degree in civil or environmental engineering. After selecting an area for study and research, candidates, in consultation with their major professor, form a doctoral supervisory committee to assist in the formulation of research and study programs and to monitor their progress. The supervisory committee approves the selection of major and minor program requirements. Research on the doctoral dissertation may not be formally started prior to passing the qualifying examination.

Faculty

The faculty has broad ranging interests and specialties. Faculty members, their rank, degree, and research areas are listed below:

AbdelRazig,Yassir, associate professor, Ph.D., Purdue University; construction engineering and management, infrastructure assessment, computer applications.
Abichou, Tarek , assistant professor, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; environmental geotechnics, geotechnical engineering, waste contaminent systems, groundwater remediation, flow in porous media.
Chen, Gang, assistant professor, Ph.D., Univerity of Oklahoma; subsurface transport, environmental biotechnolgoy, surface chemistry, and geochemistry.
Hilton, Amy B. Chan, associate professor, Ph.D., University of Virginia; application of genetic algorithms to groundwater remediation systems, groundwater modeling, contaminant hydrogeology, surface water and estuarine modeling.
Huang, Wenrui, associate professor, Ph.D., University of Rhode Island; hydrodynamic and pollutant transport of estuaries and other surface water systems, hydraulic and coastal engineering analysis.
Mtenga,Primus V., associate professor, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, P.E.; structural systems; behavior modeling and analysis, wood and wood based structural components and structures, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of structures, biocomposites, structural mechanics.
Moses, Ren, associate professor, Ph.D., Arizona State University, P.E.; incident detection and management systems, traffic operations and control, highway safety analysis and remedial measures, intelligent transportation systems (ITS).
Wei-Chou Virgil Ping, professor, Ph.D, University of Texas at Austin, P.E.: transportation design and materials, pavement design and management, geotechnical engineering.
Roddenberry, Michelle, assistant professor, Ph.D., Virginia Tech., P.E.; prestressed concrete, segmental bridges, bridge durability and structural monitoring.
Sobanjo, John, associate professor, Ph.D., Texas A & M University, P.E.; transportation engineering, infrastructure engineering and management, construction engineering, computer applications.
Spainhour, Lisa, associate professor, Ph.D., North Carolina State University; computer applications in civil engineering, engineering data management, computer aided analysis and design, composite materials, structural analysis.
Tawfiq,Kamal, chairman and professor, Ph.D., University of Maryland, P.E.; geotechnical engineering, soil structure interaction, dynamic/nondestructive testing, numerical modeling, geosynthetics..
Wekezer, Jerry W., professor, Ph.D., Gdansk Technical University, P.E.; solid mechanics, finite elements, structural analysis, high-performance computing, impact dynamics and simulations, roadside safety structures, crashworthiness and transportation safety.

Graduate Course Listing according to Areas of Concentration

Definition of Prefixes

CCE - Civil Engineering Construction
CEG - Civil Engineering Geotechnical
CES - Civil Engineering Structures
CGN - Civil Engineering General
CWR - Civil Engineering Water Resources
ENV - Civil Engineering Environmental
TTE - Civil Engineering Transportation
 
I. Construction Engineering  Sem.Hrs.
CCE 5035 Construction Planning and Scheduling3
CCE 5036 Project Controls in Construction 3
  
II. Geotechnical Engineering  
CEG 5015 Advanced Soil Mechanics 4
CEG 5065 Soil Dynamics 3
CEG 5115 Foundation Engineering 3
CEG 5127 Highway Pavement Design 3
CEG 5203 Advanced Site Investigation 3
CEG 5415 Groundwater, Seepage, and Drainage 3
CEG 5705 Environmental Geotechnics 3
  
III. Structural Engineering  
CES 5105 Advanced Mechanics of Materials 3
CES 5106 Advanced Structural Analysis 3
CES 5218 Fundamentals of Structural Stability Theory 3
CES 5209 Structural Dynamics 3
CES 5325 Bridge Engineering 3
CES 5585 Earthquake/Wind Engineering 3
CES 5606 Advanced Steel Design 3
CES 5706 Advanced Reinforced Concrete Design 3
CES 5715 Prestressed Concrete 3
CES 6116 Finite Elements in Structures 3
  
IV. Hydraulic/Water Resources Engineering 
CWR 5205 Hydraulic Engineering II 3
CWR 5515 Physical Models of Hydraulic Systems 3
CWR 5516 Numerical Models in Hydraulics 3
CWR 5535 Deterministic Hydrologic Modeling 3
CWR 5635 Water Resources Planning and Management 3
CWR 5646 Multiobjective Water Resources Decision Analysis 3
  
V. Environmental Engineering  
ENV 5045 Environmental Systems Analysis 3
ENV 5055 Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment 3
ENV 5105 Air Quality Management 3
ENV 5335 Hazardous Waste Management  3
ENV 5356 Solid Waste Engineering 3
ENV 5407 Water Reuse Engineering 3
ENV 5504 Environmental Engineering Processes and Operations     3
ENV 5565 Design of Water Quality Management Facilities 3
ENV 5615 Environmental Impact Analysis 3
  
VI. Traffic and Transportation Engineering 
TTE 5006 Transportation Engineering 3
TTE 5205 Traffic Engineering 3
TTE 5206 Advanced Traffic Flow Analysis 3
TTE 5256 Traffic Engineering Operations 3
TTE 5267 Theory of Traffic Flow 3
TTE 5270 Intelligent Transportation Systems 3
TTE 5526 Airport Planning and Design 3
TTE 5606 Transportation System Analysis 3
TTE 5645 Environmental Analysis of Transportation System 3
TTE 5805 Highway Geometric Design3

Graduate Course Description

CCE 5035  Construction Planning and Scheduling
(3)  Prereq: CCE 4004. Planning, basic arrow diagramming, basic precedence diagramming, establishing activity duration, scheduling computations, bar charts, project controls, overlapping networks, resource leveling, and program evaluation review technique (PERT).
CCE 5036 Project Controls in Construction (3) Prereq: CCE 4004; EGN 3443. Construction cost estimation, work breakdown structure, and cost control; critical path method (CPM) scheduling, resource-constrained scheduling, and integrated scheduling-cost control; probabilistic scheduling techniques, and linear scheduling techniques; contract specifications, and contract claims (schedule impact) analysis.
CEG 5015 Advanced Soil Mechanics (3) Prereq: CEG 3011. Mechanical behavior, internal stresses, and stability analysis of noncohesive soils, compressibility, consolidation, and settlement of cohesive soils, analytical techniques for predicting earth movement.
CEG 5115 Foundation Engineering (3) Prerequisite: CEG 3011. Design of spread footings, pole and caisson foundations, retaining structures and waterfront structures. Investigation of slope stability.
CEG 5127 Highway and Airport Pavement Design (3) Prereq: CEG 4801. Analysis of materials used for highway and runway pavements; design of rigid and flexible pavements and sub-bases for highways and airports; geotechnical considerations.
CEG 5705 Environmental Geotechnics (3) Prereq: CEG 3011. The geotechnical aspects of waste containment and storage. Aspects of design, construction, and performance of earthen structures for storing or disposing waste or remediating contaminated sites.
Structural Engineering
CES 5105 Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3) Prerequisites: CES 3100; EGN 3331. This course covers analysis and design of load-carrying members, shear center, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, beams on elastic foundations, energy methods, theories of failure, thick-walled cylinders, and stress concentrations.
CES 5106 Advanced Structural Analysis (3) Prerequisites: CES 3100; EGN 3331. This course covers matrix algebra review, direct stiffness method for truss analysis, computer applications, statically indeterminate structures, slope-deflection and moment distribution methods, and computer modeling and analysis of structures using commercial FE codes.
CES 5144 Matrix Methods for Structural Analysis (3) Prerequisites: CES 4101; MAP 3305. This course covers selected fundamental techniques, including energy methods, for the formulation of the stiffness method for structural analysis. Topics include formation of element matrices, transformed element matrices, structure stiffness matrices, and equations of equilibrium. Solution techniques using computers are also covered.
CES 5209  Structural Dynamics (3) Prereq: CES 4101; MAP 3305. This course covers analysis and design of single- and multi-degree-of-freedom structures subjected to various types of excitations and initial conditions. Topics include computational aspects of dynamic analysis, including approximate methods of analysis, and introduction to earthquake loading and design.
CES 5218 Fundamentals of Structural Stability Theory (3) Prereq: CES 4101. This course covers elastic and inelastic buckling of columns including large deformation theory and imperfect columns, beam column theory, and buckling of frames. Methods of analysis include the formation and solution to differential equations, energy methods, and matrix methods. AISC stability design techniques are used with LRFD format. Computer software is used as a teaching tool.
CES 5325 Bridge Engineering (3) Prereq: CES 4605, 4702. This course is an introduction to design of modern steel and concrete highway bridges. Topics include materials and properties, loads on bridges, and substructure design. AASHTO LRFD Specifications are used.
CES 5585 Earthquake/Wind Engineering (3) Prereq: CES 4101; MAP 3305. This course covers fundamentals of structural dynamics for earthquake and wind loading. Topics include response of undamped and damped single/multi degree-of-freedom structures subjected to earthquake or wind dynamic loadings, response spectra, and Fourier analysis and frequency domain.
CES 5606 Advanced Steel Design (3) Prereq: CES 4101, 4605. This course covers the behavior of complex steel elements and structures. Topics include analysis and design of columns and beams under combined effects of flexure, shear and torsion. Other topics include lateral torsional buckling, plastic analysis, design of plate girders, and design of frames.
CES 5706 Advanced Concrete Design (3)  Prereq: CES 4101, 4702. This course covers advanced topics pertaining to complex reinforced concrete elements and structures. Topics include analysis and design for torsion, biaxial columns, slender columns, two-way slabs, retaining walls, shear walls, deep beams, and the strut-and-tie method.
CES 5715 Prestressed Concrete (3) Prereq: CES 3100; EGN 3331. This course covers the behavior and design of prestressed concrete structures. Topics include design of prestressed concrete beams for flexure and shear, design of slabs, prestressing losses, serviceability of prestressed concrete members, and precast members.
CES 5845 Composites in Civil Engineering (3)  Prereq: CCE 3101; CES 3100; EGN 3331. This course covers fundamental theories of composite materials. Topics include forms of composites and their reinforcements; physical, chemical, and mechanical properties; design and testing methods; and civil engineering applications of composite materials.
CES 6116 Finite Elements in Structures (3)  Prereq: CES 4101; MAP 3305. This course covers basic concepts of finite element analysis. Topics include boundary conditions; computer techniques used in structural analysis; structural finite elements for trusses, beams, beams on an elastic foundation, and frames; plane stress and plane strain in triangular elements; and engineering modeling.
CGN 5310 Engineering Data Systems (3) Conceptual data modeling; application and use of relational database management systems and geographical information systems; introduction to modern conceptual tools (genetic algorithms, neural networks, etc.); completion of individual projects applying course knowledge to sub-disciplines within the civil engineering program, according to student interest.
CGN 5905r Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours when topics change.
CGN 5910r Supervised Research (1–6). (S/U grade only.) May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours, and a maximum of three (3) semester hours may apply to the master’s degree.
CGN 5930r Special Topics (1–6). Special topics in civil engineering with emphasis on recent developments. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester hours. Consult instructor.
CGN 5931r Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1–6). Special topics in civil engineering with emphasis on recent developments. Contents and credits will vary. May be repeated to a maximum of six (6) semester credit hours. Consult instructor.
CGN 5935 Civil Engineering Seminar (0). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Graduate student status. Graduate students are expected to enroll in the course every semester they are enrolled at FAMU or FSU. The students should attend at least 75% of the seminars offered each semester to obtain a satisfactory grade.
CGN 5971r Master’s Thesis (1–6). (S/U grade only.) A thesis representing six (6) credit hours of academic work is a requirement for the master’s degree in civil engineering. This course provides a means of registering for thesis work and recording progress toward completion. A maximum of six (6) credit hours may be applied toward the master’s degree. May not be repeated for more than six (6) semester credit hours.
CGN 5974r Master’s Project (3). (S/U grade only.) A master’s project representing three (3) semester hours of academic work is a requirement for the MS degree with the non-thesis option in civil engineering. This course provides a means of registering for master’s project work. May be repeated twice; will focus on research, design, or evaluation of a relevant civil engineering problem.
CGN 6942 Supervised Teaching (3). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: Doctoral candidate status. Students receive credit for teaching an undergraduate course under supervision of graduate faculty. PhD candidacy required.
CGN 6972 Master’s Thesis Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: CGN 5971. Required of students enrolled in the master’s thesis option. Students must register in the semester they plan to defend their thesis.
CGN 6980r Dissertation (1–24). (S/U grade only.) Prerequisite: doctoral candidate status. A dissertation representing twenty-four (24) semester hours of academic work is a requirement for the PhD degree in civil engineering. This course provides a means of registering for dissertation and recording progress toward completion. May be repeated as often as approved by the supervisory committee. A maximum of twenty-four (24) semester hours may be applied toward the PhD degree.
CGN 8985r Dissertation Defense (0). (P/F grade only.) Prerequisite: Doctoral candidacy. Must be included in the final semester schedule for all doctoral students. May be repeated once.
CGN 8988r Doctoral Preliminary Exam (0). (P/F grade only.) All doctoral students must enroll in the course the semester they intend to take the qualifying exam. May be repeated once.
CWR 5125 Groundwater Hydrology (3) Prereq: CWR 3201; EES 3040. This course examines the fundamentals of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Topics include: Darcy’s law, flow nets, mass conservation, heterogeneity and anisotropy, storage properties, 3-D equation of groundwater flow, regional recirculation, unsaturated flow, recharge, stream-aquifer interaction, well hydraulics, slug test analyses and contaminant transport processes.
CWR 5205 Hydraulic Engineering II (3) Prereq: CWR 4202, MAP 3305. Course presents advanced hydraulic concepts and their incorporation into the design process. Methods of solving such problems are also presented.
CWR 5305 Urban Stormwater Runoff (3) Prereq: CWR 3201. Corequisites: CWR 4101. This course investigates the effects of urban stormwater runoff on surface and ground water resources. Topics include legal and regulatory requirements, methods of engineering analysis and design of storm water systems.
CWR 5516 Numerical Models in Hydraulics (3)  Prereq: CWR 3201, 3201L, MAP 3305. Numerical approaches including finite element techniques used in hydrology and hydraulics are presented and applied to simple engineering case studies.
CWR 5635 Water Resources Planning and Management (3) Prereq: CWR 4101, 4202. Quantity and quality planning of water resources systems. Economic considerations.
CWR 5824 Coastal and Estuarine Hydraulics (3) Prerequisites: CWR 3201; MAC 2313. This course examines numerous topics including coastal hydraulic principles and waves in estuaries and coastal oceans, wave properties and wave forces on coastal structures, tidal motions, mixing and transport in estuaries, and coastal engineering analysis.
ENV 5028 Remediation Engineering (3) Prereq: ENV 4001 or equivalent.. This course reviews various innovative remediation technologies used for clean up of contaminated soil and groundwater at a site such as air sparging, soil vapor extraction, reactive walls, reactive zones, stabilization technologies, hydraulic pneumatic fracturing and pump-and-treat systems.
ENV 5030 Applied Environmental Engineering Microbiology (3) Prereq: ENV 4001 or equivalent. This course focuses on the survey of environmentally important microbes and the roles they play in environmental restoration processes. Major topics include basics of microbiology, stoichiometry and bacterial energetics, bioremediation and other environmental microbiology applications, and detoxification of hazardous chemicals.
ENV 5045 Environmental Systems Analysis (3) Prereq: ENV 4001, MAC 2311 Systems analysis techniques applied to the solution of environmental problems with particular emphasis on linear and dynamic programming.
ENV 5055 Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment (3) Prereq: CWR 3201; EES 3040; or equivalent, MAP 3305 Study of the processes of pollutant chemicals transformation in and transport between air, water, and soil or sediments. Use and development of predictive mathematical models for the remediation of existing contaminated sites or prevention of future contamination from new sources.
ENV 5105 Air Pollution Control (3) Prereq: ENV 4001. This course investigates analytical concepts for determination of sources, amounts, and transport of air pollutants; health and environmental effects; design of control devices and management programs.
ENV 5407 Water Reuse Engineering (3)  Prereq: ENV 4001 or equivalent. Course covers wastewater reclamation and reuse; treatment processor and systems; monitoring and control instrumentation; health and social aspects; design of facilities/systems.
ENV 5504 Environmental Engineering Processes and Operations (3) Prereq: ENV 4001 or consent of instructor. Operational and design features of the physical, chemical, thermal, and biological treatments used in engineering for the management of solid and hazardous wastes.
ENV 5565 Design of Water Quality Management Facilities (3) Prereq: CWR 3201, EES 3040, 3040L. Analysis of operations, processes, and systems used in the design of facilities for maintaining water supply quality, wastewater control, and aquatic pollution control. Design of wastewater collection systems, water and wastewater treatment plants, and systems for disposal for residuals from such facilities.
ENV 5615 Environmental Impact Analysis (3) Prereq: ENV 3040, 3040L. Analysis of various measures of environmental quality. Impacts on different types of resources and benefit-cost in environment impact assessment.
TTE 5205 Traffic Engineering (3) Prereq: TTE 3004 or equivalent. Nature, characteristics, and theories of traffic flow. Street and highway traffic problems. Traffic survey procedures. Origin-destination studies. Theory and design of automatic control of traffic systems. Transit systems.
TTE 5206 Advanced Traffic Flow Analysis (3) Prereq: TTE 3004. Course covers microscopic and macroscopic characteristics, traffic stream models, demand-supply analysis, shockwave analysis, queueing analysis, computer simulation models, intelligent transportation systems.
TTE 5256 Traffic Operations (3) Prereq: TTE 3004. Course covers principles of capacity, freeways, rural highways, urban streets, transportation systems, and computer simulation.
TTE 5270 Intelligent Transportation Systems (3) Prereq: TTE 3004. Course covers advanced traffic management systems (ATMS), advanced traveler information systems (ATIS), advanced vehicle control systems, commercial vehicle operations, rural ITS human factors, institutional issues, architecture and standards, simulation and modeling.
TTE 5805 Highway Geometric Design (3) Prereq: CEG 2202, 2202L; TTE 3004. Principles and procedures for the geometric design of highways and streets; considerations of traffic, land use, and aesthetic factors.