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Civil and Environmental Engineering

Program Educational Objectives
Engineering Design

Civil Engineering Major
Environmental Engineering Major
Undergraduate Course Descriptions
Graduate Courses

Faculty
Chair: Tawfiq, Kamal S.
Professors: Ping, Wei-Chou Virgil; Twafiq, Kamal S.;  Wekezer, Jerry W.
Associate Professors: AbdelRazig, Yassir; Abichou, Tarek; Hilton, Amy B. Chan; Huang,Wenrui; Mtenga; Moses, Renatus; Sobanjo, John;  Spainhour, Lisa
Assistant Professors: Chen, Gang; Rambo-Roddenberry, Michelle

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has the mission of teaching the fundamentals of civil engineering science, analysis, design, and management to empower students to assume careers as professional engineers, to conduct basic and applied research, to improve the state of knowledge of civil engineering, to serve as a source of information and advice to the community on engineering matters, and to assist in the continuing education of professional engineers and other interested individuals. The department has a special mission to provide an opportunity for a civil engineering education for minorities and women.

Opportunities and Facilities. Many opportunities exist in the field of civil engineering that encompass planning, designing, and managing a variety of projects. Your work could be on site at a project or at a computer work station. Civil and environmental engineers often find themselves involved in many of the public work projects funded by federal, state, and municipal governments, as well as those projects undertaken by the private sector. As a structural engineer, you might analyze and design structures out of steel, concrete, aluminum, timber, plastic, and other new materials that are able to support required loads and withstand natural disasters. An environmental engineer, with a background in either physical, chemical, or biological science, helps to prevent and solve environmental problems. Engineers in the geotechnical realm apply technology, field test information, and laboratory analyses related to mechanics and mathematics to create the infrastructure facilities within and on top of the earth. The structure and stability of soils determine how and where to construct tunnels, pipelines, and deep foundations as well as highways and other buildings. In hydraulic and water resources engineering, you might design, construct, or maintain facilities related to the quality and quantity of water, flood prevention, wastewater treatment, and water front erosion protection. As a professional in transportation engineering, your purpose is to move people and things in a safe and efficient manner locally and through mass transportation systems. Transportation facilities include highways, airfields, railroads, and sea ports. Several courses are also offered in construction engineering.

Instructional equipment includes the MTS structures and material testing systems with computer control for data acquisition and analysis, triaxial, CBR, LBR, and shear testing equipment and seismographs for in situ and laboratory measurements of engineering properties of soils and rocks; and a self-contained glass-sided tilting flume for investigations of flow phenomena and sediment transport. A complete stand-alone automated data acquisition and analysis system is available for undergraduate student laboratory work and research. A fully equipped water quality testing lab as well as portable field testing kits are used both for classroom teaching as well as for student research and design projects.

Students have access to a large number and variety of computer systems. A network of nearly 700 computing devices is available for the academic and research efforts of the college.

The department houses the Crashworthiness and Impact Analysis Laboratory, which is a well equipped state-of-the-art, high-performance computing environment for the pursuit of transportation-related research. The equipment includes a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 technical server with sixteen parallel processors and a cluster of workstations for fast visualization and pre- and post- processing. This advanced computing environment is available primarily to graduate students working as research assistants with departmental faculty. The college computers are connected to a high-speed, switched, fiber-optic LAN and to the Internet via the Florida State University connection to the NSF v BNS network. Desktop computers are supported by a cluster of Sun, DEC, and SGI servers. Other nearby resources include the School of Computational Science and Information Technology (CSIT). Additional information about the department can be obtained from the college home page: http://www.eng.fsu.edu.

Programs Offered. The department offers a program of study for the Bbachelor of Sscience (BS) degree in civil engineering. The civil engineering major is broad-based, emphasizing all aspects of civil engineering practice, including structural analysis and design; geotechnical, construction/transportation, hydraulics, and water resources; and environmental engineering. Within the civil engineering program, the environmental engineering major is a course of study that focuses primarily on environmental engineering, hydraulics, hydrology, water resources, and the management of all types of wastewater systems.   The department also offers a minor in environmental engineering science.  Regardless of focus, all students are taught to apply state-of-the-art technologies to the solutions of problems in these areas.

The department offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science (MS) and doctoral (PhD) degrees in civil engineering. These programs provide areas of concentration in structural, geotechnical, environmental/water resources, and construction/transportation engineering. The department also offers a certificate in water and environmental resources engineering in partnership with the Center for Professional Development. Students may enroll as special students if they intend to use the certificate credits later. Students who do not wish to receive academic credit may sign up for continuing education units (CEU’s). Twelve (12) semester hours are required to complete the program. Information and registration may be found at http://www.eng.fsu.edu/certificateprogram/. In order to be admitted to the MS program, a student must have a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering, a 3.0 grade point average (GPA) in the last two years of undergraduate school, and a Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of at least 1000. Exceptions may be granted where other evidence indicates an ability to perform satisfactory graduate work. A student without a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering may be required to complete undergraduate engineering articulation courses prior to attempting more advanced work. Admission to the doctoral program requires possession of a master’s degree in civil or environmental engineering or a closely allied academic discipline from an accredited college or university, good standing in the academic institution last attended, evidence of a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale as an upper level undergraduate or graduate student, and a minimum score of 1100 on the GRE. Exceptional applicants with a BS degree may be admitted to the PhD program, provided they complete an MS degree in the department before obtaining the PhD degree. For more details, refer to the Graduate Bulletin.

Program Educational Objectives

Upon completion of their course of study, graduates of the program in civil engineering are expected to be able to accomplish the following:
1.    Progress in successful professional careers in civil, environmental or related engineering fields, or intent to continue their studies at the graduate level;
2.    Engage in design or management issues, both professional activities needed by society, which are based on sound academic knowledge, gained management, oral and written communication and   
       leadership skills, and on engineering practices;
3.    Become recognized professional engineers with a demonstrated commitment to life-long learning and continuous selfimprovement in order to respond to the rapid pace of change in the profession of
       civil and environmental engineering; and
4.    Contribute to work force diversity as members and leaders of inter/multi-disciplinary teams.
Program Learning Outcomes.  By the time of graduating from the Civil Engineering program, students should attain the following outcomes:

           1.      An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics through differential equations, science (including calculus-based physics, general chemistry, and one additional area of science), and engineering;
           2.      An ability to design and conduct civil engineering experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret the resulting data;
           3.      An ability to design systems, components, or processes in more than one civil engineering context to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, 
                    ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability;
           4.      An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams;
           5.      An ability to identify, formulate, and solve civil engineering problems;
           6.      An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, and an ability to explain basic concepts in management, business, public policy, and leadership as well as the importance of professional 
                    licensure;
           7.      An ability to communicate effectively;
           8.      The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context;
           9.      A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in lifelong learning.;
         10.      A knowledge of contemporary issues;
         11.      An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice; and
         12.     An ability to apply knowledge of four technical areas appropriate to civil engineering.

Engineering Design
Following engineering design criteria established by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), the civil engineering curricula provide excellent design experiences for students. Faculty of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering have carefully integrated design components into the curriculum with increased complexity as students progress toward graduation. These design components offer opportunities for students to work individually and in teams on meaningful engineering design experiences building upon the fundamental concepts of mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, social sciences, engineering topics, and oral and written communication skills. Design components in engineering course work help students develop an appreciation for and apply the knowledge of the wide variety of courses they have studied. Consequently, they participate in meaningful solutions and effective design development for practical engineering problems.

A majority of the design experiences are integrated into junior and senior level courses. For example, design experience is expanded in the civil engineering curriculum when students have completed EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics, and progress to EGN 3331 Strength of Materials, then to CES 3100 Structural Analysis. Students are exposed to extensive design experiences in CES 4702 Concrete Design and CES 4605 Steel Design.

A major in environmental engineering includes ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering, which builds on material covered in EES 3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science, CWR 3201 Hydraulics, and is followed by CWR 4202 Hydraulic Engineering I and CWR 4101 Engineering Hydrology. CGN 4800 Pre-Senior Design and Professional Issues, and CGN 4802 Civil Engineering Senior Design Project, provide significant, culminating design experiences that are applied to one or two actual engineering situations for students working in multidisciplinary teams and majoring in either civil or environmental engineering.

Additional information about design credits may be obtained from departmental brochures and by contacting faculty advisers at the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

State of Florida Common Program Prerequisites
The State of Florida has identified common program prerequisites for this University degree program. Specific prerequisites are required for admission into the upper-division program and must be completed by the student at either a community college or a state university prior to being admitted to this program. Students may be admitted into the University without completing the prerequisites, but may not be admitted into the program.  Students are strongly encouraged to select required lower division electives that will enhance their general education coursework and that will support their intended baccalaureate degree program.  Students should consult with an academic advisor in their major degree area.

The following lists the common program prerequisites or their substitutions necessary for admission into this upper-division degree program:
1.    MAC X311 or MAC X281
2.    MAC X312 or MAC X282
3.    MAC X313 or MAC X283
4.    MAP X302 or MAC X305
5.    CHM X045/X045L or CHMX045C or CHS X440
6.    PHY X048/X048L or PHYX048C or PHYX043/X048L
7.    PHY X049/X049L or PHYX049C or PHYX044/X049L

Common Program Prerequisites can also be found at http://www.facts.org

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering: 

Civil Engineering Major


In addtion to college requirements, a candidate for the B.S. degree in civil engineering will be expected to successfully complete the following requirements:
Mathematics and Basic Engineering Sciences
CCE    3101 Construction Materials (3)
CCE    3101L Construction Materials Laboratory (1)
CEG    2202C Site Investigation (4)
CGN    2327L Civil Engineering Graphic Lab (1)
EGM    3512 Engineering Mechanics (4)
EGN    1004L First Year Engineering Lab (1)
EGN    2123 Computer Graphics for Engineers (2)
EGN    2212 Engineering Statistics and Computation (3)
EGN    3331 Strength of Materials (3)
EGN    3331L Strength of Materials Lab (1)
EGN    3613 Principles of Engineering Economy (2)
EEL     3003 Introduction to Electrical Engineering (3)
OR
EML    3100 Thermodynamics (2)
Civil Engineering Science and Design Core Courses (Breadth)
CEG    3011 Soil Mechanics (3)
CEG    3011L Soil Mechanics Lab (1)
CES    3100 Structural Analysis (4)
CWR   3201 Hydraulics (3)
CWR   3201L Hydraulics Lab (1)
EES    3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science (3)
EES    3040L Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science Lab (1)
TTE    3004 Transportation Engineering (3)
Civil Engineering Science and Design Courses (Depth)

Students must take the following courses in five (5) areas plus two additional Technical Electives* for a total of twenty-four (24) hours credit. To meet the requirement, students may select elective courses (as indicated below) to specialize their degree program to suit their individual objectives.
1.    Structures
       CES    4605 Steel Design (3)
       CES    4702 Concrete Design (3)
2.    Geotechnical
       CEG    4801 Geotechnical Design (3)
3.    Construction
       CCE    4004 Construction Engineering (3)
4.    Transportation
       TTE    4XXX Transportation elective (3)
5.    Environmental/Water Resources
       ENV    4001 Environmental Engineering (3)
       OR
       CWR    4202 Hydraulic Engineering I (3)
       Additional Technical Electives*
       Elective 4XXX (3)
       Elective 4XXX (3)
Note: *Technical Proficiency Electives are defined as 4000 level civil and environmental engineering courses. Other courses might be suitable to meet this requirement. Please see your adviser for details.
Major Design Experience
CGN    4800 Pre-senior Design and Professional Issues (2)
CGN    4802 Senior Design Project (3)
Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor at least once each semester. Five core courses are required for 18 credits along with four out of five proficiency course areas with electives resulting in 24 out of 30 possible credits. CGN 4800 Pre-Senior Design (1) and CGN 4802, Senior Design (3) are required courses for all students.

Below is a suggested curriculum subject to change. See a department advisor for current requirements.

Freshman YearSem. Hrs.
Fall Semester  
ENG 1004L First-year Engineering Lab (College Requirement)1
MAC 2311 Calculus I4
CHM 1045C General Chemistry I3
CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Lab1
ENC 1101 Communication Skills I3
CEG 2202 Site Investigation
4
 16
  
Spring Semester 
MAC 2312 Calculus II4
ENC 1102 Communication Skills II3
PHY 3048C Physics I with Lab5
Humanities Elective
3
 15

Sophomore Year Sem. Hrs.
Fall Semester  
MAC 3313 Calculus III5
PHY 3049C Physics II with Lab5
EGN 2123 Engineering Graphics2
EGN 2212 Engineering Statistics and Computation
3
 15
  
Spring Semester  
EML 3100 Thermodynamics2
or EEL 3003 Intro. to Electrical Engineering3
EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics4
EGN 2123L Civil Engineering Graphics Lab1
MAP 3305 Engineering Mathematics I3
EGN 3613 Engineering Economy2
History/Social Science Elective
3
 15/16
  
Summer Semester Sem. Hrs.
History/Social Science Elective3
History/Social Science Elective3
Humanities Elective3
*Required Science Elective

3
 12
Select one of the following:
*BSC 1010C (4) General Biology I, MET 2700 (3) General Meterorology, GLY 2010 (3) Principles of Geology, EVR 3023 (3) Intro. to Marine Environment or PCB 2033 (3) General Ecology.


Junior Year Sem. Hrs.
Fall Semester  
CWR 3201 Hydraulics with Lab4
EES 3040 Intro. to Environmental Engineering Science with Lab4
EGN 3331 Strength of Materials with Lab4
Humanities/Social Science Elective
3
 15
  
Spring Semester  
CCE 3101 Construction Materials with Lab4
CEG 3011 Soil Mechanics with Lab4
CES 3100 Structural Analysis I4
TTE 3004 Transportation Engineering
3
 15

Senior Year Sem. Hrs.
Fall Semester  
Design Proficiency Electives9
CGN 4800 Pre-Senior Design and Professional Issues2
CES 4605  Steel Design or CES 4702 Concrete Design
3
 14
  
Spring Semester 
Design Proficiency Electives12
CGN 4802 Senior Design Project
3
 15
Total Semester Hours128/129
*It is recommended that the science elective be completed prior to the junior year.

This is a State Common Prerequisite. Subsitutes indicated in the State Common Prerequisite Manual at www.facts.org will be accepted.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering:

Environmental Engineering Major

In addition to college requirements, a candidate for the B.S. degree in civil engineering with a major in environmental engineering will be expected to successfully complete the following course requirements:
Mathematics and Basic Engineering Sciences
CEG 2202C Site Investigation (4)
CGN 2327L Civil Engineering Graphic Lab (1)
EES 3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science (3)
EES 3040L Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science Lab (1)
EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics (4)
EGN 1004L First Year Engineering Lab (1)
EGN 2123 Computer Graphics for Engineers (2)
EGN 2212 Engineering Statistics and Computation (3)
EGN 3331 Strength of Materials (3)
EGN 3613 Principles of Engineering Economy (2)
EEL 3003 Introduction to Electrical Engineering (3)
OR
EML 3100 Thermodynamics (2)
Environmental Engineering Science and Design Core Courses (Breadth)
CCE 3101 Construction Materials (3)
CEG 3011 Soil Mechanics (3)
CEG 3011L Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1)
CWR 3201 Hydraulics (3)
CWR 3201L Hydraulics Laboratory (1)
ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering (3)
ENV 4031 Applied Environmental Engineering Microbiology (3)
OR
ENV 4xxx Applied Environmental Engineering Chemistry(3)
TTE 3004 Transportation Engineering (3)
Environmental Engineering Science and Design Courses (Depth)

Students are required to take the following courses in four areas plus two additional Technical Electives* for a total of twenty-four (24) credit hours. To meet the requirement, students may select elective courses (as indicated below) to specialize their degree program to suit their individual objectives.
1.    Environmental
       ENV 4611 Environmental Impact Analysis (3)
       OR
       ENV    4341 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering (3)
       ENV 4XXX Environmental Engineering elective (3)
2.    Water Resources
       CWR 4101 Engineering Hydrology (3)
       OR
       CWR     4202 Hydraulic Engineering (3)
       CWR 4XXX Water Resources, Hydraulics or Hydrology elective (3)
3.    Geotechnical
       CEG 4801 Geotechnical Design (3)
4.    Construction /Transportation
       TTE 4XXX Transportation elective (3)
       OR
       CCE    4XXX Construction elective (3)
       Additional Technical Proficiency Electives*
       Elective 4XXX (3)
       Elective 4XXX (3)
Note: *Technical Electives are defined as 4000 level civil and environmental engineering courses. Other courses might be suitable to meet this requirement. Please see your adviser for details.

Major Design Experience

CGN 4800 Pre-senior Design and Professional Issues (2)
CGN 4802 Senior Design Project (3)

Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor at least once each semester. In addition to college requirements, a candidate for the B.S. degree with an environmental engineering major will be expected to successfully complete the following requirements:

Freshman YearSem. Hrs.
Fall Semester  
*EGN 1004L First Year Engineering (College Requirement)1
MAC 2311 Calculus I4
CHM 1045C General Chemistry I3
CHM 1045 C General Chemistry I Lab1
ENC 1101 Communications Skills I3
CEG 2202 Site Investigation
4
 16
  
Spring Semester 
MAC 2312 Calculus II4
ENC 1102 Communication Skills II3
PHY 3048C Physics I with Lab5
Humanities elective
3
 15

Sophomore YearSem. Hrs.
Fall Semester 
EGN 2212 Engineering Statistics and Computation3
MAC 3313 Calculus III5
PHY 3049C Physics II with Lab5
EGN 2123 Engineering Graphics
2
 15
  
Spring Semester 
EGM 3512 Engineering Mechanics4
MAP 3305 Engineering Mathematics I3
EGN 2123L Civil Engineering Graphics Lab1
History/Social Science Elective
3
 11
  
Summer Semester 
History/ Social Science Elective3
History/ Social Science Elective3
Humanities Elective3
*Required Science Elective

3
 12
Select one of the following:
*BSC 1010C (4) General Biology I, MET 2700 (3) General Meterorology, GLY 2010 (3) Principles of Geology, EVR 3023 (3) Intro. to Marine Environment or PCB 2033 (3) General Ecology.


Junior YearSem. Hrs.
Fall Semester 
EES 3040 Intro. to Env. Eng. Science with Lab4
CWR 3201 Hydraulics3
EGN 3331 Strength of Materials3
TTE 3004 Transportation Engineering3
Humanities/Social Science elective
3
 16
  
Spring Semester 
EML 3100 Thermodynamics2
or EEL 3003 Intro. to Electrical Engineering3
CEG 3011 Soil Mechanics3
CEG 3011L Soil Mechanics Lab1
ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering3
ENV 4611 Environmental Impact Analysis3
EGN 3613 Engineering Economy
2
 14/15

Senior YearSem. Hrs.
Fall Semester 
CGN 4800 Pre-Senior Design & Professional Issues2
Design Proficiency electives
12
 14
  
Spring Semester 
CGN 4802 Senior Design Project3
Design Proficiency electives
12
 15
Total Semester Hours128
*It is recommended that the science elective be completed prior to the junior year.

Department Requirements
Transfer students and students within the program in civil engineering must achieve a grade of “C” or better in calculus I (MAC 2311 [4]), calculus II (MAC 2312 [4]), physics I (PHY 2048C [5]) and chemistry I (CHM 1045 [4], CHM 1045L [1]) prior to enrolling in any upper-level civil and environmental engineering classes. Students who do not meet this requirement may be directed to take additional academic work. Pre-Engineering students must adhere to the policies set by the College of Engineering. Students must achieve a grade of “C” or better in all transfer courses and in all courses that are prerequisites to any required or elective engineering course. In addition, students are required to earn a “C” or better in all engineering courses without any waiver as a graduation requirement. These courses cover the areas of mathematics and basic design, basic engineering science and design, civil engineering science and design, environmental engineering science and design, proficiency and core courses, and electives.

Course Repeat Policy
Criteria: A student in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering will be placed on
probationary status if the student falls into any of the following situations:
1.    Accrues two grades below C in a single math, science or engineering course that is required or a prerequisite in the curriculum after declaring civil or environmental engineering as a major.
2.    Accrues a total of three grades below C in math, science, or engineering courses that are required or a prerequisite in the curriculum and attempted after declaring civil or environmental engineering as a major.
3.    Has an overall GPA below 2.0.
Consequences: A student on probationary status will have their major changed administratively to Pre-Engineering.

Reinstatement: To be reinstated to the program, the student will have one semester to raise his/her GPA above 2.0 and achieve a grade of C or better on all applicable courses. Permission to enroll in other civil and environmental engineering courses during the probationary semester will only be granted after consultation with an academic advisor. No more than one reinstatement is permitted.

Dismissal: There are two causes for dismissal from the CEE program: 1) If a student is on probation and does not, during the probationary semester, raise his/her GPA above 2.0 and/or achieve a grade of C or better in the math, science, or engineering course(s) that was(were) cause for probation or in any other math, science, or engineering course taken during the probationary semester , the student will be permanently dismissed from and will not be reinstated to the CEE program 2) If a student who has been reinstated to the program falls below an overall GPA of 2.0 and/or fails to achieve a grade of C or better in any math, science, or engineering course, then the student will be permanently dismissed from and will not be reinstated to the CEE program.

Fundamental Of Engineering Exam
All undergraduate students are encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam in the civil engineering discipline during their senior year.

Honors in the Major
The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers Honors in the Major to encourage students to undertake independent and original research to enhance their undergraduate experience.  For requirements and other information, see the "University Honors Office and Honor Societies" chapter of this General Bulletin.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Engineering Science
A minor in environmental engineering science requires a minimum of twelve (12) semester hours of course work in environmental engineering, which includes EES 3040 and ENV 4001 plus six (6) additional hours in courses with prefixes EES or ENV at the 3000 level or above, with no more than one (1) of the following courses counting towards the minor: ENV 4341, ENV 4611.  Students must consult with the department and obtain written approval before taking courses towards the minor.  Students also must satisfy stated prerequisites before enrolling in any environmental engineering course. Grades of “C“ or better must be earned in each course accepted for minor credit. If an environmental engineering science minor is combined with a civil engineering major, EES 3040 and one other course, up to six (6) credits total, may count toward both the major and the minor.


Definition of Prefixes
CCE, Civil Construction Engineering
CEG, Civil Engineering
CES, Civil Engineering Structures
CGN, Civil Engineering
CWR, Civil Water Resources
EES, Environmental Engineering Science
EGN, General Engineering
ENV, Environmental Engineering
TTE, Transportation and Traffic Engineering

CCE 3101 Construction Materials
(3) Prereq: EGN 3331, Properties and characteristics of construction materials for civil and highway engineers; metals, aggregates, cements, concrete, asphalt and timber.

CCE 3101L Construction Materials Lab
(1) Prereq/Coreq: CCE 3101, Prepare concrete and asphalt specimens, test construction materials under compression, tension, torsion loading. Write formal laboratory reports.

CCE 4004 Construction Engineering
(3) Prereq: ENG 3613, CCE 3101, Theories, principles, and applications of engineering professionalism and ethics. Emphasis on pre-design planning, scheduling, contracts and specification, construction methods, equipment and safety.

CCE 4014 Construction Cost Estimating
(3) Prereq: CCE 3101; EGN 3613. Corequisite: CCE 4004. Construction contracts, organization and cost accounting systems; preliminary cost estimation and cost indices; estimating material, labor and equipment costs; construction bidding practices and bid proposals; and project budgeting and cost systems.

CCE 4031 Construction Planning and Scheduling
(3) Prereq: CCE 4004. Planning, basic arrow diagramming, basic precedence diagramming, establishing activity duration, scheduling computations, bar charts, project controls, overlapping networks, resource leveling and program evaluation review technique (PERT).

CEG 2202C Site Investigation
(4). Prereq./Coreq: MAC 1114. Methods and procedures of surface mapping and subsurface sectioning including distance measurements, traverse computations and topographic mapping, photogrammetry, data collection, landform and terrain analysis, field instrumentation, and characterization of geologic materials. Use of field equipment and procedures to measure angles and distance, photo interpretation, and geological materials characterization.

CEG 3011 Soil Mechanics
(3). Prereq: CEG 2202, ENG 3331. Study of physical properties of soils and their behavior under stress and strain under idealized conditions. Use of laboratory methods to determine soil properties. Written formal reports are required.

CEG 3011L Soil Mechanics Laboratory
(1). Prereq: CEG 3011. Determine physical and mechanical properties of different types of soil using laboratory and field testing techniques. Write formal report on experiments.

CEG 4111 Foundation Engineering
(3). Prereq: CEG 4801. Design of spread footings, pile and caisson foundations, retaining structures, and waterfront structures. Investigation of slope stability. Choice between alternative designs.

CEG 4701 Environmental Geotechnics
(3). Prereq: CEG 3011. The geotechnical aspects of waste containment and storage. Aspects of design, construction, and performance of earthen structures for storing or disposing waste or remediating contaminated sites.

CEG 4801 Geotechnical Design
(3). Prereq: CEG 2202C. Design of different geotechnical structures including shallow foundations, slopes and embankments, and earthwork with geosynthetics. Determine soil properties in the laboratory and write formal reports.

CES 3100 Structural Analysis
(4). Prereq: EGM 3512; EGN 2212. Pre- or corequisite: EGN 3331. Loads on structures. Reactions, shear, and bending moment. Trusses. Influence lines. Deflection of determinate structures; introduction to indeterminate structures.

CES 4101 Advanced Structural Analysis
(3). Prereq: CES 3100, EGN 3331. Review of matrix algebra. Direct stiffness method for truss analysis. Computer applications. Statically indeterminate structures. Slope-deflection and moment distribution methods. Computer modeling of structures.  Application of modern computer commercial codes for structural analysis.            

CES 4330 Optimal Structural Engineering (
3). Prereq: CES 4605, 4702; EGN 2212; MAP 3305. Course covers standard theories of structural design plus classical optimization and latest structural optimization methods.

CES 4605 Steel Design
(3). Prereq: CES 3100; EGN 3331. Design of tension, compression, and flexural steel member according to AISC specifications. Bolted and welded connections for steel members. Choice between design alternatives, introduction of plastic design methods.

CES 4702 Concrete Design
(3). Prereq: CES 3100; EGN 3331. Design of reinforced concrete beams, columns, one-way slabs, etc., for bending, shear deflection, cracking and bond. As part of this class, students will learn computer and oral communication skills relevant to concrete design.

CES 4704 Advanced Concrete Design
(3). Prereq: EGN 3331; CES 3100, 4702. Advanced topics pertaining to complex reinforced concrete elements and structures. Analysis and design of beams for torsion, biaxial and long columns, two-way slabs, shear walls, plates and shell design.

CES 4711 Prestressed Concrete
(3). Prereq: CES 4702. Theoretical background of prestressed concrete. Losses in prestressing. Design of prestressed concrete beams and slabs. Serviceability of prestressed concrete members. Precast members.

CES 4800 Timber Design
(3). Prereq: CES 3100. Design of basic timber structures such as beams, columns, walls and diaphragms. SBC and the NDS code applications are used.

CES 4830 Masonry Design
(3). Prereq: CES 3100. Design of basic reinforced masonry structures such as walls, columns, and foundations. SBC and code applications are used.

CGN 2327L Civil Engineering Graphic Lab
(1) Prereq: EGN 2123. Lab section for the Computer  Graphics for Engineers general course; provides hands-on experience in utilizing the latest version of AutoCAD and MicroStation for technical drawing typical of the design projects in civil and environmental engineering.

CGN 3949r Cooperative Work Experience
(0). (S/U grade only.) Field work in an approved civil engineering agency program for integration of theory and professional practice.

CGN 4800. Pre-senior Design and Professional Issues
(2). Prereq: senior standing. Topics in this course include engineering and professional ethics; professional practice issues; and design under engineering  and societal constraints. Preparation of proposals for multidisciplinary design projects are completed the following semester in CGN 4802, Senior Design Project.

CGN 4802 Senior Design Project
(3). A capstone senior level design course integrating the knowledge gained in undergraduate studies. Completion of a team-based design project covering several sub-disciplines in civil or environmental engineering. Industry participation.

CGN 4930r Special Topics
(1 - 3). Topics in civil and environmental engineering with an emphasis on recent developments. Topics and credit may vary. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 semester hours.

CWR 3201 Hydraulics
(3). Prereq: EGM 3512; EGN 2212; MAP 3305. Fundamental concepts of fluid properties, hydrostatics, kinematics, ideal flow viscous effects, transport phenomena; drag, laminar, and turbulent flow in pipes and channels; dimensional analysis, network design.

CWR 3201L Hydraulics Lab
(1). Prereq: EGM 3512; EGN 2212; MAP 3305. Coreq: CWR 3201. Participation in hydraulics experiments and demonstrations and reporting experimental results in formal technical reports.

CWR 4101 Engineering Hydrology
(3). Prereq: CWR 3201, 3201L; EGN 2212; or their equivalents. Study of the processes of the hydrologic cycle, hydrologic analyses for the planning and design of water management systems, use of application program packages.

CWR 4103 Water Resources Engineering
(3). Prereq:  CWR 4202; EGN 2212. Systems approach to complex water resources problems; application of systems analysis of water resources operations, design, and planning.

CWR 4120 Groundwater Hydrology
(3). Prereq.: CWR 3201, EES 3040. Fundamentals of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. Topics include Darey’s Law, flow nets, mass conservation, haterogeneity and anisotropy, storage properties, groundwater flow, circulation, unsaturated flow, recharge stream-aquifer interaction, well hydraulics, slug test analyses and contaminant transport processes.

CWR 4202 Hydraulic Engineering I
(3). Prereq: CWR 3201, 3201L; EGN 2212; or their equivalents. Review principles of hydrology and hydraulics. Apply principles to design of water supply, urban drainage, flood control, and hydraulic energy conversion systems. Computer-aided design of hydraulics systems.

CWR 4203 Hydraulic Engineering II
(3). Prereq: CWR 4202. Present methods for analyzing a broad range of unsteady flow conditions and for the design of facilities to cope with problems that may result. Apply computer programs, based on these methods, for practical water distribution and open channel systems.

CWR 4306 Urban Stormwater Runoff
(3).Prereq.: CWR 3201, or consent of instructor. Coreq: ENV 4001.  This course is intended to provide an understanding of (1) storm events, stormwater runoff and effects of urbanization on stormwater quantity and quality; (2) methods of analysis; and (3) planning and design procedures for stormwater facilities.

CWR 4822 Coastal and Estuarine Hydraulics
(3). Prereq.: CWR 3201, MAC 2313. Coastal hydraulic principles and waves in estuaries and coastal ocean, wave properties and wave forces on coastal structures, tidal motions, mixing and transport in estuaries and coastal engineering analysis.

EES 3040 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science
(3). Prereq: CHM 1045, 1045L. Application of environmental sciences to fundamentals of environmental engineering. Emphasis on water and air pollution, their sources and treatment; solid and hazardous waste management.

EES 3040L Introduction to Environmental Engineering Science Laboratory
(1). Prereq: CHM 1045, 1045L. Coreq: EES 3040. Course covers use of field and laboratory instruments for measuring air and water quality indicators. Includes site visits.

EGN 2212 Engineering Statistics and Computations
(3). Prereq: use of www and Internet resources; EGN 1004L; MAC 2311. Course covers problem formulation; algorithm development and programming; measurement and computational error assessment; application of statistical and numerical modeling  tools for data analysis; and use of Mathcad software package.

EGM 3512. Engineering Mechanics
(4) Prereq: MAC 2312; PHY 2048. Coreq: MAC 2313.  Topics in this course include statistics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies using vector analysis, free body diagrams, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, particle and general rigid body motion, work/energy, and impulse and momentum methods.

EGN 3331 Strength of Materials
(3). Prereq: EGN 3311; Coreq: CES 3100. Axial, torsional, and flexural stresses and strains, normal stress and shear stress. Mohr’s circle; torsion bending, stress, transformation of stress; safety factors; engineering applications.

EGN 3331L Strength of Materials Lab
(1). Prereq: EGM 3512; Coreq: EGN 3331. Main topics to be covered include: stress-strain relationship, tensile members, members under the torsion, flexural behavior, thin walled vessels and column buckling.(Lab not required for environmental majors.)

EGN 4906r Directed Individual Study
(1-3). Directed special project/research in an area of civil engineering science or design not covered in the curriculum. This course may be repeated.

ENV 4001 Environmental Engineering
(3). Prereq: CHM 1045; CWR  3201; EES 3040, 3040L. Design of water and wastewater treatment plants, wastewater collection systems; air and water pollution control; solid waste management; contemporary environmental issues.

ENV 4022 Remediation Engineering
(3). Prereq: ENV 4001 or equivalent. Coreq: CWR 4202 or equivalent. This course reviews various innovative remediation technologies used for cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater at a site such as air sparging, soil vapor extraction, reactive walls, reactive zones, stabilization technologies, hydraulic and pneumatic fracturing pump-and-treat systems.

ENV 4031 Applied Environmental Microbiology
(3) Prerequisite: ENV 4001 or equivalent. This course focuses on the survey of environmentally important microbes and the roles they play in environmental restoration processes. Major topics include basics of microbiology, stoichiometry and bacterial energetics, bioremediation and other environmental microbiology applications, and detoxification of hazardous chemicals.

ENV 4041 Environmental Systems Analysis
(3). Prereq: EES 3040, 3040L; ENV 4001; MAC 2311. Systems analysis techniques applied to the solution of environmental problems, with particular emphasis on linear and dynamic programming.

ENV 4053 Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment
(3). Prereq: CWR 3201 or equivalent; EES 3040. Study of the processes of pollutant transformation and their transport between air, water and soil or sediments. Use and development of predictive mathematical models for the remediation of existing contaminated sites or prevention of future contamination from new sources.

ENV 4341 Solid and Hazardous Waste Engineering
(3). Prereq: EES 3040, 3040L; ENV 4001. Course covers definitions and characteristics of solid and hazardous wastes. History, growth and magnitude of the problem. Legislative, regulatory, and technical aspects of waste generation, storage, collection, transportation, processing, transformation and disposal.  Design of waste minimization and recycling programs. Case studies of waste management.

ENV 4405 Water Reuse Engineering
(3). Prereq: CHM 1045, 1045L; EES 3040. Sources of water for reuse, treatment processes and systems, monitoring and control instrumentation, health and social aspects of wastewater reclamation/water reuse, design of facilities/systems.

ENV 4500 Environmental Unit Processes and Operations
(3). Prereq: CWR 3201; ENV 4001. Corequisite: CWR 4202. The operational and design features of the physical, chemical, thermal, and biological treatments used in engineering for the management of solid and hazardous waste.

ENV 4561 Design of Water Quality Management Facilities
(3). Prereq: CWR 3201; EES 3040, EES 3040L; EGN 2212. Analysis of operations, processes, and systems used in the design of facilities for maintaining water supply quality, wastewater control, and aquatic pollution control. Design of wastewater treatment plants and systems for disposal of residuals from such facilities.

ENV 4611 Environmental Impact Analysis
(3). Prereq: EES 3040, 3040L. Analysis of various measures of environmental quality. Impact of human activity on water, land, and air resources. Benefit-cost analysis in environmental impact assessment.

TTE 3004 Transportation Engineering
(3). Prereq: CEG 2202C; EGN 2212; junior standing. An introductory study of all modes of transportation in the United States with special emphasis on highway planning and design, construction, operation, management, and safety.

TTE 4201 Traffic Engineering
(3). Prereq: TTE 3004. Nature, characteristics, and theories of traffic problems. Traffic survey procedures, origin-destination studies. Introduction to theory and design of automatic control of traffic systems.

TTE 4250 Traffic Operations
(3). Prereq: EGN 2212; TTE 3004. Operation of transportation systems, monitoring, regulation, and control traffic.

TTE 4271 Intelligent Transportation Systems
(ITS) (3). Prereq: EGN 3443; TTE 3004. Course covers advanced traffic management systems (ATMS), advanced traveler information systems (ATIS), advanced vehicle control systems, commercial vehicle operations, rural ITS, human factors, institutional issues, architecture and standards, simulation and modeling.

TTE 4804 Highway Geometric Design
(3). Prereq: CEG 2202C; TTE 3004. Principles and procedures for the geometric design of highways and streets; consideration of traffic, land use, and aesthetic factors.

TTE 4830 Hot Mix Asphalt Mixture Design
(3). Prerequisite: CCE 3101. The course covers aggregate properties and tests, tests of asphalt and asphalt concrete mixes, fundamental engineering characteristics of hot-mix asphalt concrete, mix design methods for asphalt concrete, as well as Superpave-mix design methodology and production and placement of hot-mix asphalt.

Graduate Courses
CCE 5035 Construction Planning and Scheduling (3).
CCE 5036 Project Controls in Construction (3).
CEG 5015 Advanced Soil Mechanics (3).
CEG 5115 Foundation Engineering (3).
CEG 5127 Highway and Airport Pavement Design (3).
CEG 5705 Environmental Geotechnics (3).
CES 5105 Advanced Mechanics of Materials (3).
CES 5106 Advanced Structural Analysis (3).
CES 5144 Matrix Methods for Structural Analysis (3).
CES 5209 Structural Dynamics (3).
CES 5218 Fundamentals of Structural Stability Theory (3).
CES 5325 Bridge Engineering (3).
CES 5585 Earthquake/Wind Engineering (3).
CES 5606 Advanced Steel Design (3).
CES 5706 Advanced Concrete Design (3).
CES 5715 Prestressed Concrete (3).
CES 5845 Composites in Civil Engineering (3).
CES 6116 Finite Elements in Structures (3).
CGN 5310 Engineering Data Systems (3).
CGN 5905r Directed Individual Study (1–6). (S/U grade only.)
CGN 5910r Supervised Research (1–5). (S/U grade only.)
CGN 5930r Special Topics in Civil Engineering (1–6).
CGN 5935 Civil Engineering Seminar (0). (S/U grade only.)
CGN 6942 Supervised Teaching (3). (S/U grade only.)
CWR 5125 Groundwater Hydrology (3).
CWR 5205 Hydraulic Engineering II (3).
CWR 5305 Urban Stormwater Runoff (3).
CWR 5516 Numerical Models in Hydraulics (3).
CWR 5635 Water Resources Planning and Management (3).
CWR 5824 Coastal and Estuarine Hydraulics (3).
ENV 5028 Remediation Engineering (3).
ENV 5030 Applied Environmental Engineering Microbiology (3).
ENV 5045 Environmental Systems Analysis (3).
ENV 5055 Chemical Fate and Transport in the Environment (3).
ENV 5105 Air Pollution Control (3).
ENV 5407 Water Reuse Engineering (3).
ENV 5504 Environmental Engineering Processes and Operations (3).
ENV 5565 Design of Water Quality Management Facilities (3).
ENV 5615 Environmental Impact Analysis (3).
TTE 5205 Traffic Engineering (3).
TTE 5206 Advanced Traffic Flow Analysis (3).
TTE 5256 Traffic Operations (3).
TTE 5270 Intelligent Transportation Systems (3).
TTE 5805 Highway Geometric Design (3).