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FLORIDA A&M UNIVERSITY
CELEBRATES 125 YEARS
WITH A TRIBUTE TO AFRICAN-AMERICAN FILMS

Presented by FAMU Lyceum Series, the Office of Student Activities, the Tallahassee Film Festival, and the Tallahassee Film Society

Friday, February 3 

8 p.m. 
Dare Not Walk Alone (2009)
Opening Remarks by Mr. Tom Roche, editor of the film Dare Not Walk Alone
Admission is $8 per person.

To a soundtrack that mixes gospel with hip-hop, this film tells the story of the heroic, but often overlooked protests by black and white civil rights supporters in 1964 in Saint Augustine...


Saturday, February 4

African-American Films Marathon
(1921-1940)
The Museum of Florida History, 500 South Bronough Street, R. A. Gray Bldg

11 a.m.
The Flying Ace (1926)
Admission is free of charge.

A veteran World War I fighter pilot returns home a war hero and immediately regains his former job as a railroad company detective. His first case: recover a stolen satchel filled with $25,000 of company payroll, locate a missing employee, and capture a gang of railroad thieves.

2:15 p.m.
The Emperor Jones (1933)
Admission is free of charge.

Unscrupulously ambitious Brutus Jones escapes from jail after killing a guard and through bluff and bravado finds himself the emperor of a Caribbean island.
 
6 p.m. 
Lecture "Laughter: It's Medicine & It's Message" by Christopher "Play" Martin followed by a question and answer session
Lee Hall Auditorium, FAMU’s Campus

Christopher Martin professionally known as "Play" from the rap and acting duo Kid 'n Play will briefly talk about his life prior to success in the entertainment world. He will share how he realized that one of keys ingredients to popular entertainment success is the subject matter better known as content. He would discuss how he and many others have used everyday situations and issues in life and tell and or re-enact in comedic form or presentation. Martin will also present Director and Producer Robert Townsend’s "Why We Laugh."

9 p.m.
Presentation of African-American Films
Alley Pat (2006)
All Saints Cinema, 918 ½ Railroad Avenue
Admission is $8 is per person.

Alley Pat celebrates the daring and outrageous era of classic rhythm and blues radio with a rich profile of the man who helped start it all.


Wednesday, February 8

7 p.m.  
Forum: Succeeding in the Film Industry
Turner Auditorium, TCC’s Campus
Admission is free of charge, if reserved in advance. Admission is $5 the day of the forum.

  • Anthony B. Major, assistant director, stage manager, actor, director of the Zora Neale Hurston Institute for Documentary Studies, and a Professor in the Film School at UCF.
  • Mr. Lewis "Jiggs" Walker, property manager
  • Mr. Melvin Johnson, casting director for film and television
  • Ms. Valerie Scoon, a professor at the FSU Film School and formerly with Harpo Studios. 
  • Mr. Akil DuPont, Student Emmy winning short film director/co-writer
  • Ms. Rosalind Stevenson, publicist for major movies and numerous movies starring black actors
  • Mr. Robert Stevenson, hair stylist for Whoopi Goldberg, Eddie Murphy, Angela Basset, Laurence Fishburne and for 14 years personal stylist for Samuel Jackson


Saturday, February 11

African-American Films Marathon
(1941-1968)
Lee Hall Auditorium
Admission is $5 per person.
       
Noon 
Stormy Weather (1943)

The relationship between an aspiring dancer and a popular songstress provides a retrospective of the great African-American entertainers of the early 1900s.

2:30 p.m.
The Jackie Robinson Story (1950)

Biography of Jackie Robinson, the first black major league baseball player in the 20th century, traces his career in the Negro leagues and the major leagues.

6 p.m. 
Imitation of Life (1959)

A struggling young actress with a six-year-old daughter sets up housekeeping with a homeless black widow and her light-skinned eight-year-old daughter who rejects her mother by trying to pass for white.

8:30 p.m.
In the Heat of the Night (1967)

An African-American detective is asked to investigate a murder in a racist southern town.


Sunday, February 12

Recently Released Films
Lee Hall Auditorium, FAMU’s Campus
Admission is $5 per person.

4 p.m.  
Underground (2010) by Akil Dupont 

In a story told through song, Bali plans to escape from slavery after learning that his master is going to sell his young daughter...

4:30 p.m. 
Psychedelic Shack (2011) by Kenneth Jones

“It’s Hilarious.” Psychedelic Shack is a very funny movie about a duel between a funky mortician and a monkey.

6 p.m.
Writer's Workshop by Gregory Anderson, president of Tri Destined 

Writer, producer, distributor and president of Tri Destined Films, Anderson has been called a part of the “new” Oscar Micheauz movement as a trailblazer for independent film distribution.  As a writer, Anderson created Stomp the Yard, the No. 1 movie two weeks in a row, which has grossed more than $100 million. 

While studying at Harvard University during the summers, he independently produced and distributed a film called Trois.  Soon after that release, he wrote, co-produced and distributed Pandora’s Box, also highlighted in Variety and Hollywood Reporter’s Top List.


Saturday, February 18

African-American Films Marathon
(1969-1980)
Lee Hall Auditorium
Admission is $5 per person.

Noon 
Super Fly (1972)

Super Fly is a cocaine dealer who begins to realize that his life will soon end with either prison or his death. He decides to build an escape from the life by making his biggest deal yet, converting the coke to cash and running off to start a new life. The problem is that the Mob does not have a retirement plan and will give him a choice of staying and selling for them or dying if they find out his intentions.

2:15 p.m.
Shaft (1971)

Cool black private eye John Shaft is hired by a crime lord to find and retrieve his kidnapped daughter.

6 p.m. 
Sounder (1972)

The son of a family of black sharecroppers comes of age in the Depression-era south after his father is imprisoned for stealing food.

8 p.m. 
Cooley High (1975)

Chicago, enjoy life to the fullest...parties, hanging out, meeting new friends. Then life changes for two of the guys when they meet a pair of career criminals and get falsely arrested in connection with stealing a Cadillac. We follow their lives through the end of high school and the dramatic end to their school year.


Saturday, February 25

African-American Films Marathon
(1981-1990)
Lee Hall Auditorium
Admission is $5 per person.

Noon 
Do the Right Thing (1989)

On the hottest day of the year on a street in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, everyone's hate and bigotry smolders and builds until it explodes into violence.

3 p.m. 
Glory (1989)

Robert Gould Shaw leads the US Civil War's first all-black volunteer company, fighting prejudices of both his own Union army and the Confederates.

6 p.m. 
Lean on Me (1989)

The dedicated but tyrannical Joe Clark is appointed the principal of a decaying inner-city school that he is determined to improve.

8:15 p.m.
House Party (1990)

Young Kid has been invited to a party at his friend Play's house. But after a fight at school, Kid's father grounds him. Nonetheless, Kid sneaks out when his father falls asleep. But Kid doesn't know that three of the thugs at school have decided to give him a lesson in behavior...


Sunday, February 26

African-American Films Marathon
(1991-2000)
Lee Hall Auditorium
Admission is $5 per person.
 
4 p.m. 
Boyz N the Hood (1991)

A saga based on a group of childhood friends growing up in a Los Angeles ghetto.

6:15 p.m.
Eves Bayou (1997)

The story is set in 1962 Louisiana. Charming doctor Louis heads the big Batiste family. Though he is married to beautiful Roz, he has a weakness for attractive women patients. One day Louis is flirting with married and sexy Metty Mereaux, not knowing that his youngest idealistic daughter Eve observes him, who is there by accident. Eve cannot forget the incident, which is traumatic for her naïveté and shares a secret with older sister Cisely. Lies start to roll.

8:15 p.m.
Chocolate City (1994)

The film deals with the struggles of a young man trying to define himself at a historically black college. "The decisions you make today will affect you for a lifetime."


Tuesday, February 28

7 p.m.
A Tribute to African-American Films Dinner
Highlighting the Stories within the Stories: A Salute to the Triumph of the American Spirit
Grand Ballroom, FAMU’s Campus
Admission is $25 per person.


Wednesday, February 29

7 p.m. 
Film Presentation by FAMU Alum Will Packer
Lee Hall Auditorium
Admission is $5 per person.