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Office of Counseling Services
 

   
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Phone  850.599.3145
Fax  850.599.8481

Office of Counseling Services
101 Sunshine Manor
Tallahassee, FL 32307
 
 
The Office of Counseling Services has partnered with FAMU Student Health Services and FAMU Public Safety to increase sexual assault awareness and prevntion efforts on FAMU's campus. 

  Sexual Assault Resource Numbers
FAMU Public Safety (24 hours a day)
850-599-3256
FAMU Student Health Services
850-599-3777
FAMU Office of Counseling Services
850-599-3145
Refuge House Crisis Hotline (24 hours a day)
850-681-2111 or 800-500-1119

What is sexual assault?
The intentional sexual contact, characterized by the use of force, threats, intimidation, abuse of authority, or when the victim does not or cannot consent. Sexual assault includes rape, forcible sodomy (oral or anal) and other unwanted sexual contact that is aggravated, abusive or wrongful (including unwanted sexual contact) or attempts to commit these acts.

What to do if you have been sexually assaulted?
  • Go to a safe place.
  • If you want to report the crime, notify the police immediately. Reporting the crime can help you regain a sense of personal power and control. FAMU Public Safety is 599-3256
  • Call a friend, a family member, or someone else you trust who can be with you and give you support.
  • Preserve all physical evidence of the assault. Do not shower, bathe, douche, eat, drink, wash your hands, or brush your teeth until after you have had a medical examination. Save all of the clothing you were wearing at the time of the assault.
  • Get medical care as soon as possible. Go to a hospital emergency department or a specialized forensic clinic that provides treatment for sexual assault victims. Even if you think that you do not have any physical injuries, you should still have a medical examination and discuss with a health care provider the risk of exposure to sexually transmitted infections and the possibility of pregnancy resulting from the sexual assault. Having a medical exam is also a way for you to preserve physical evidence of a sexual assault.
  • Write down as much as you can remember about the circumstances of the assault, including a description of the assailant.
  • Get information whenever you have questions or concerns. After a sexual assault, you have a lot of choices and decisions to make - e.g., about getting medical care, making a police report, and telling other people. You may have concerns about the impact of the assault and the reactions of friends and family members. You can get information by calling a rape crisis center, a hotline, or other victim assistance agencies.
  • Talk with a counselor who is trained to assist rape victims. Counseling can help you learn how to cope with the emotional and physical impacts of the assault. You can find a counselor by contacting  the Office of Counseling Services, Refuge House, RAINN. RAINN is a national victim assistance organization, at 1-800-656-HOPE.
Facts About Date Rape
Here are some data collected from a national study of college students:
  • 1 in 4 college women have either been raped or suffered attempted rape.
  • 84% of the women who are raped knew their assailants.
  • 57% of the rapes occurred on a date.
  • Women ages 16-24 have 4 times higher risk of being raped than any other population group.
  • 1 in 12 male students surveyed had committed acts that met the legal definition of rape.
  • 16% of male students who had committed rape took part in episodes with more than one attacker's gang rape.
  • 75% of male students and 55% of female students involved in date rape had been drunk or using drugs.*
  • 33% of males surveyed said that they would commit rape if they could escape detection.**
  • 25% of men surveyed believed that rape was acceptable if: the woman asks the man out; or the man pays for the date; or the woman goes back to the man's room after the date. ***
* Koss, M.P. (1988). Hidden Rape: Incidence, Prevalence and descriptive Characteristics of Sexual Aggression and Victimization in a National Sample of College Students. In Burgers, A.W. (ed.) Sexual Assault. Vol II. New York: Garland Publishing Co.
** Malamuth, N.M. (1986). Predictors of Natural Sexual Aggression. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50, 953-962.
*** Muehlenhard, C.L., Friedman, D.E. & Thomas, C.M. (1985). Is Date Rape Justifiable? Psychology of Women Quarterly, 9, 297-310

Rape Myths And Facts
                         
Myth: Rape is caused by lust or uncontrollable sexual urges and the need for sexual gratification.
Fact: Rape is an act of physical violence and domination that is not motivated by sexual gratification.
 
Myth: Once a man gets sexually aroused, he can't just stop.
Fact: Men do not physically need to have sex after becoming sexually excited. Moreover, they are still able to control themselves after becoming aroused.
 
Myth: Women often lie about rape or falsely accuse someone of rape.
Fact: Statistical studies indicate false reports make up 2% or less of the reported cases of sexual assault. This figure is approximately the same for other types of crimes. Only 1 out of 10 rapes are actually reported. Rapes by someone the victim knows are the least likely to be reported.
 
Myth: Women provoke sexual assault by their appearance. Sexual attractiveness is a primary reason why a rapist selects a victim.
Fact: Rapists do not select their victims by their appearance. They select victims who are vulnerable and accessible. Victims of sexual assault range in age groups from infants to the elderly. Sexual attractiveness is not an issue.
 
Myth: Sexual assault is a topic that only concerns women, and men do not have to be concerned about sexual assault.
Fact: According to recent rape crisis center statistics, men, both straight and gay, suffered 10% of the sexual assaults reported in the US last year. (Almost all were raped by other men.) In addition, men have wives, friends, sisters, mothers, and daughters who may someday need assistance in coping with sexual assault. Rape is a concern for everyone.
 
Myth: If a woman really did not want to be raped, she could fight off her attacker.
Fact: Even if the rapist is not carrying a weapon, the element of surprise, shock, and fear, or the threat of harm can overpower a survivor.